Is my rooster sick? is it contagious? ????

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by folly foot, Oct 22, 2016.

  1. folly foot

    folly foot Out Of The Brooder

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    About a few weeks back I notice my roos acting diffrently (actually asked about it on here) bit last week he started to loose his feathers around his Crest (not Sur eif that's the right name but you know what I mean) and I honestly thought it was just molting and didn't think much of it. But upon closer inspection the skin in place of the lost feathers has turned ashy white. And then one of our older hens has started showing the same symptoms, they both seemed to have lost energy and besides eating drinking and sleeping they don't do anything anymore..... anybody experience this before? What do I do?
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Can you post some photos?
    What type of food/treats do you feed?

    White ashy skin on the comb can be an indication of Favus.

    Treatment is usually applying an anti-fungal cream to the affected areas.

    Check your flock over well for any signs of lice/mites too. If you see any, then treat with some poultry dust.

    Clean and sanitize your water stations and offer some extra protein like egg, tuna, mackerel or meat. Adding some poultry vitamins to their water for a couple a days a week may be helpful as well.

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/59/favus/
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/e...ases_in_backyard_poultry.html?qt=favus&alt=sh
    http://www.aun.edu.eg/developmentvet/poultry diseases fourth year/ch2_4.htm
     
  3. folly foot

    folly foot Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG][/IMG]
    Sorry I know bad photos, I also had an idea thinking that it might be dust from their feed but when I gently tried to rub it off a bit but nothing worked
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    That does look like favus, the fungus that Wyorp Rock posted about above. Walmart and dollar stores carry clotrimazole (Lotrimin) or miconazole (Monistat) creams which can be used to treat favus. It is contagious.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
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  5. folly foot

    folly foot Out Of The Brooder

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    I'll try and pick some up tomorrow and apply it at night when all the birds are together... any specific way to apply either of those? Anything I should be careful of? Like possible side effects? And is this fungus deadly?
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You may want to wear gloves to apply the anti-fungal cream/ointment. When I use creams/ointment I usually place a small amount on a piece of waxed paper or some other type of "container", then take it to where I am treating my bird(s). This way I don't contaminate the ointment tube (bottle) I am using. Use your fingers and/or qtips to get into nooks and crannies. I've found qtips are helpful when treating combs. If you have someone to help it is easier, if not and the chicken is not complaint, gently wrapping them in an old towel helps keep them still.

    If you can, separate your bird with it's own food/water container(s). This may help prevent the spread of fungus and you will be able to monitor him more closely. Clean and sanitize the food/water containers daily.

    It is not necessarily "deadly" in itself, but if it goes unchecked (begins spreading into the feathered portions of the body), then it can affect the health of the chicken and ultimately in severe cases can cause death.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
  7. folly foot

    folly foot Out Of The Brooder

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    The problem is (I'm new as a chicken farmer and this is my first flock) I'm thinking by looking at their crests that more are affected then I previously thought my dad wants me to do all the chickens just in case they are all infected. In the case I've gotten a close look at it is just minor and surrounding the Crest and hasn't spread further... I'm going to do a full flock check... should I do them all just in case like my dad said? I'm also going to scrub down the coop what sort of cleaner is safest? Any brands that will work? And we make sure to clean their dishes daily.. I'm nervous though I have some younger birds in the flock that are only around 2 monthes old ... will It affect them any worse than the older birds?
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Treat any chicken you see that has any white (fungus) starting on their comb. Change gloves and use different qtips for each bird to reduce the spread of the fungus.

    Keeping your water stations clean and sanitized will be helpful.

    Make sure they have fresh water daily and are eating a good nutritionally balanced poultry feed. Limit or eliminate sweet treats and extra carbohydrates (breads) and give fresh veggies/fruits or a small amount of scratch for a treat. Increasing protein may be helpful as well, give things like scrambled/hard boiled egg, tuna, mackerel or meat.
     
  9. folly foot

    folly foot Out Of The Brooder

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    Anything to look out for if I were to give them tuna? Any ingredients that I should keep an eye out for? Is clover leaf okay to give them or would unico be better?
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    A small amount of clover may be o.k.

    I am not familiar with unico? So can't comment on that. If you have access to fresh greens like kale, mustard greens or some cabbage, those would make fine fresh treats. A little apple or a few grapes would be good too.

    If you give tuna, use the kind packed in water. You can mix it in with their regular feed to make a wet "mash" or just give them some tuna in a separate dish so this can be taken out and cleaned.
     

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