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Is my she a he?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by ChandyRae02, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. ChandyRae02

    ChandyRae02 New Egg

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    I got my four chicks about five weeks ago, they are almost six weeks old. This is my first time, and BC has been a wealth of information for every single question I've had! But I am really starting to worry that my Rhode Island Red might be a he instead of a she, so I came to the experts. Please help! It would be heartbreaking for my kids and I to have to give her up.

    Like I said, almost six weeks old. Her feathers came in very evenly. She did have a dot on top of her head when we got her. Her legs are no darker, thicker, or larger than my other girls. For size she is no bigger, actually my second smallest out of four. She has dark feathers on the back of her neck but not on tail, chest, or belly. She does not usually hold herself upright unless there is possible danger nearby. She is very docile and happy to nestle down in my hand and go to sleep. So why am I worried? She is definitely the most aggressive of the chicks, especially if there is perceived danger, when she seems to be trying to keep the others in line. Her comb is much larger than the others (although to be fair they all have different types, including a rose comb and one with virtually no comb at all). Her wattles are a little bigger too. And tonight she ran at one of the other chicks when that chick accidentally fell on her, and the feathers on her neck were raised!

    Can anyone give me a more educated opinion of what you think all this means? I really appreciate it!! (She prefers to be squatted down but I made her stand for the photo. Younger one to show head dot)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  2. ChandyRae02

    ChandyRae02 New Egg

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    If another angle or age photo is helpful let me know, I have plenty lol
     
  3. RevaT1987

    RevaT1987 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am not a expert but she does not look like a RIR to me, the ones I have owned in the past were a solid reddish/ brown color, they didn't have darker feathers on their back. Could you get a side shot of her face? Showing her/his waddle and comb.
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    That's a little cockerel. I agree it doesn't look like a RIR, the chick color is off. but that probably doesn't matter to you much since he's male.
     
  5. ChandyRae02

    ChandyRae02 New Egg

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    I wondered that, it seems like all the RIR pics I'm seeing are much darker than mine. I have absolutely no clue what else she could be though, store labeled them all RIR. How's this for a side shot?

    [​IMG]
     
  6. RevaT1987

    RevaT1987 Out Of The Brooder

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    I was also thinking cockerel, but wasn't 100% sure because of the angle.
     
  7. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not completely sure on the breed of the chicken, but looking at its age, and the size of its comb, it appears to be a young cockerel.
     
  8. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    Not a RIR and its a boy- sorry
     
  9. ChandyRae02

    ChandyRae02 New Egg

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    Can anyone tell me why they think that, so I know what to look for in the future? Is it just the size of the comb?

    Finally figured out (s)he's a Production Red
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  10. Minnowey

    Minnowey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it's a production red, there might be a tiny sliver of hope that it's a pullet, because they develop really fast. But it is nearly 100% a male. Males cobs turn red and they grow wattles very fast, where a female's comb should not grow very much up until near the point of lay, when her combs and wattles will have a growth spurt, and turn red.
     

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