is rabbit poo okay for chickens to eat

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by ladybuglives, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. ladybuglives

    ladybuglives Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 30, 2010
    humboldt county
    I have six 12 week old chicks who are beginning to forage in the yard. They love the pile of hay that I use as mulch around plants. It's hay from my houserabbit's litterbox -- oat, wheat, barley mix. Every now and then I see one of the girls gulping down a round brown thing -- I finally figured out it was Geordie's poo! He is a healthy bunny with a strictly veggie/hay/Oxbow Timothy pellet diet. I have his litterboxes mulching my entire garden. In order to keep the girls away I would have to restrict them to a very few areas (probably with an electric fence). Anyone know about bunny poo and it's safety for chickies?????
     
  2. dsqard

    dsqard Crazy "L" Farms

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    Jun 11, 2010
    York PA
    I don't know for sure but I do know that our neighbor's chickens used to scratch and pick in my horse manuer piles all day long and they seemed fine and healthy. Even got to eat any of their eggs that they laid in our barn. They were yummy!
     
  3. NanoByte

    NanoByte Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 11, 2010
    Sydney
    I never knew chickens ate poo...
    maybe its not the poo, maybe its something in the poo.
     
  4. mickistoy

    mickistoy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2010
    northern ohio
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Amyh

    Amyh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2010
    North Carolina
    I have heard of people using a system where they place rabbits in the same space as the chickens. In cages above where the chickens live and having the chickens further compost the rabbit manure, so I'm sure it's fine. I think I read it on the Polyface farm blogs...
     
  6. they'reHISchickens

    they'reHISchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Chickens frequently peck through the remnants of manure for undigested grains ( corn, wheat, whatever). In the 1900s it was customary to run pigs in with corn fed beef cattle to do the same thing, according to Grandpa.
     
  7. mgw

    mgw Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Eastern Wa.
    Our niehbors dog eats our rabbit poop ang it seems real healthy I dont think theres any worries. Stupid niehbor dog stealing all my fertilizer![​IMG]
     
  8. dieselgrl48

    dieselgrl48 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2010
    Virginia
    Well if rabbit poo hurt chicken's half of my old flock would have been long dead.I free ranged a lot of my bird's in the last few year's and We had rabbit's only a few though.They had standard nice open bottom hutches allowing the dropping's to fall through.Numerous bird's pecked around the area.Chicken's eat their own poo's!I cleaned one coop today and they were all like flie's around the wheelbarrow and in the dropped hay and shavin'g I lost.They will be just fine.Taking a break tomm. they may be waiting a day on the next coop until Thur.Chickens are gonna eat anything basicaly that catche's their eye.Cattle and ponie's graze our field too and they just go around pecking pecking.I don't give them goodnight kisse's anymore just hugzzzz lol
     
  9. Mrs. Feathers

    Mrs. Feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 2, 2010
    Our chickens love to get in the bunny run so they can a) see if she has better treats and b) eat her poop...ewwww. However, the amount bunnies eats and poops I don`t even know if it is digested....[​IMG] looks pretty much the same coming out as the pellets do going in...only bigger.
     
  10. DragonEggs

    DragonEggs Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 11, 2010
    Borger, TX
    Should be just fine. Many critters like bunnys, hamsters, gerbils, etc, eat their own poop to re-digest what they missed the first time around. Chickens are really good at getting the goodies out of horse poop too.
     

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