Is roo still good if put to rest but not bled out?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by TNBarnQueen, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. TNBarnQueen

    TNBarnQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 28, 2010
    East Tennessee
    This evening my son was traveling our road and a mans roo run straight out in front of him. It was a good size roo and only damage was to it's head. He did not know what to do buy knew that I put the roos in the fridge to rest them but he did not know how to bleed it out. Will it be ok if I do that in the morning?? Will the meat still be good? The man who owned it was going to just throw it away and my son knows that this roo had a use...food!! Thanks everyone![​IMG]
     
  2. DianeS

    DianeS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 28, 2010
    Oregon
    Some people intentionally don't bleed the chicken out. They like the taste better. So whether to bleed out or not is a matter of personal preference.

    Tomorrow you won't be able to bleed it out the normal way, the blood will have coagulated. But you can brine it, and that will draw most of the blood out a different way, if you choose to do so. Or try it without bleeding it at all, and see if maybe you like it better.
     
  3. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    most people would brine it, that's why most hunters brine game birds. good thinking on your son's part!
     
  4. TNBarnQueen

    TNBarnQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 28, 2010
    East Tennessee
    Thanks for the help!!
     
  5. Sorry, but what does "brine it" mean?
     
  6. DianeS

    DianeS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 28, 2010
    Oregon
    A "brine" is a mixture of water, salt, and sugar, in specific proportions. You put the chicken (or other meat) into this mixture and it draws the bood out of the tissues while helping to tenderize the meat. It has to do with osmosis, the salt content of blood, the chemical makeup of muscle tissue, and a lot of other chemistry I don't fully understand. But it works!

    There are recipies online, with minor variations to each of them. You throw the brine away when you remove the meat in preparation for cooking.
     
  7. booker81

    booker81 Redneck Tech Girl

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Mid-MI
    A brine isn't a marinade, but more of a fantastic way to prep meat [​IMG] An easy one is one gallon of water, one cup of non-iodized salt (canning salt), and one cup of brown sugar. Mix it up, put the meat in it, and let it sit in the fridge.

    If the meat is exceptionally bloody, a good soak in cold water a few times will be better, so then you put "clean" meat in the brine. It will still turn the brine colors, but the brine won't have to work so hard.
     

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