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Is the incubator too hot now for baby chick?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Candice W, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. Candice W

    Candice W Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 8, 2014
    Tennessee
    Just had some baby chicks hatch a few hours ago. The one that hatched a few hours ago still has some drying off to do but is panting in the incubator. The temp is 100 and the humidity is 65. I have ventilation for her but she keeps going up to the glass window looking out like she wants out. That probably sounds funny. But I guess that's what it seems like. Anyways, she opens her beak, keeps it open and it looks like panting. Help!! Should I put her in the brooder?
     
  2. Hilacraft

    Hilacraft Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 24, 2014
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    As soon as the chicks have dried and fluffed up completely, remove them from the incubator and place them in holding quarters where the temperature is approximately 95o F (35 C). Then give them fresh water and feed. Rearing the chicks as a project has certain limitations, but if they are to be kept for a few days, they should be given a chick-starting mash obtainable at any feed or farm supply store. Fresh water is also important.
    Since the disposal of day-old or started chicks may be difficult, have the solution to this problem worked out before you undertake this project. If you are going to rear the chicks at home, secure your parents' permission and cooperation in advance.
    Cleaning the incubator. When the hatch is completed, disconnect the incubator. Remove all shells and unhatched eggs and wipe the interior clean with a soapy sponge. Permit the incubator to air dry for several days by leaving the door open.
    Cleaning can be made easier if you place a layer or two of cheesecloth or crinoline on the rack on the 17th or 18th day of incubation to catch the egg shell and other debris. This will also help to prevent injury to the chicks' navels. After the chicks are removed the cheesecloth can be discarded.


    http://chickscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/resources/egg_to_chick/procedures.html
     
  3. Candice W

    Candice W Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 8, 2014
    Tennessee
    They are dry and in their brooder warm and happy. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2014
  4. Candice W

    Candice W Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 8, 2014
    Tennessee
    Hilacraft,
    Thank you for the good information. Just wanted to confirm that this isn't a project and I'm 45 years old. lol Anyways, we have had chickens for about 7 years now, getting them at about a day old, so I'm familiar with that part and have the brooder all set up. This is just my first time at hatching, so of course even after the countless hours of reading and studying all the info ahead of time I knew there would still be questions that I had. I'm very thankful for BYC and again appreciate your help!
     

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