Is there a difference between laying mash and crushed corn???

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by evansc3, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. evansc3

    evansc3 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 3, 2010
    I have been feeding my chicks Dumor feed from the start. I'm not sure if I need to continue with the more expensive feed or can I go to plain crushed corn? Also, where do you get your grit and oyster shell? I think I understand that the grit is needed to help break up the feed. What does the oyster shell do? Do I need both? And at what point do I need to give it to them?
     
  2. justmeandtheflock

    justmeandtheflock Overrun with ducklings :)

    May 27, 2009
    NW NJ
    Corn is not a complete feed, they need the layer formula once they are of laying age. Up until then they should stay on the chick feed. The grit helps them break up food but they only need it if they are still in the brooder and you are feeding them snacks other than their chick feed. Once they go outside they can pick up plenty of rocks and sand on thier own. The oyster shell is calcium that they need to make hte egg shells. They don't need any until they start laying. If they are eating a layer formula they may not need any extra calcium but each bird is different. It is a good idea to set out a bowl for them to pick at if they need to.
     
  3. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 26, 2009
    California
    1. Crushed corn is a treat, not food. It has almost zero food value, and none of the stuff required for laying hens- please dont feed it as a sole food source.
    2. Grit can be found naturally by free ranging hens, is bought in bags at feed stores, some folks buy canary grit and put it in bowls for their flock.
    3. Oyster shell is bought seperatly from grit at feed stores or online and is for laying hens to help with egg shell production- add small amounts to feed, or in a bowl in run.
    4. Grit can be fed to any chicken old enough to free range or get treats, about 5 weeks, but some folks give finer grit to younger chicks to help them grind up treat foods and seeds. Oyster shell is usually fed to hens at point of lay and from then on.

    Hope this helped!
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2010
  4. math ace

    math ace Overrun With Chickens

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    Jacksonville, FL
    Crushed corn is for fattening up the chickens. It does not have the needed protein / calcuim that the layers need.
    It is the chicken EQUAL of CANDY - - - Empty Calories.
    It will make them FAT. I've read that FAT chickens don't lay as well as chickens at their appropriate weight.


    Laying crumbles / mash has protein and calcuim that the hens need to produce those wonderful eggs.
     
  5. evansc3

    evansc3 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 3, 2010
    Thank you both so much! I kind of suspected.
     
  6. evansc3

    evansc3 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 3, 2010
    Thanks Math Ace. Seems that laying mash is the general concensus. Will do! Nothing but the best for my babies![​IMG]
     
  7. cletus the rooster

    cletus the rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    corn will not meet the nutritional needs.if you choose to feed the grower you will need free will oyster shell in order to get eggs.if you go with laying mash shell is not needed.if they are on the ground (dirt,free range) you should not need grit.they will get their own.oyster shell is for the calcium.i use laying mash only,except for the momma hen with babies.that flock gets starter/grower with the free will oyster shell.
     
  8. evansc3

    evansc3 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm afraid this may be a stupid request. Please define "free range." My chicks are in a 16x4 ft pen. Their coop is an above ground and doesn't take up ground space in their pen. I just need to know if I need to suppliment with grit. The area was grassy before I put them out there, but is mostly dirt now.
     

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