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Is there such a thing?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Sunshine Hen, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. Sunshine Hen

    Sunshine Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2007
    Stamford, CT
    I was wondering...Is there such a thing as a battery-powered heater? If there is can you tell me where or how to get one? Thankyou!
     
  2. Sunshine Hen

    Sunshine Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2007
    Stamford, CT
    anyone? Hellooo? :|
     
  3. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2007
    Philly, PA
    Not sure about a battery-powered one, but I'm betting you can get an electric one and run it off a car battery.

    Is this for your coop?

    Honestly you should just get one of those very long, orange industrial power cords and run your heat lamps off it from a power source inside your house.
     
  4. Sunshine Hen

    Sunshine Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2007
    Stamford, CT
    yea that's what I thought...Oh well [​IMG] I have an outdoor electric plug, but it's far from where I'm planning to build the coop. An extension cord will work. Should I burry it a little, so it's protected, or just leave it?
     
  5. Critter Crazy

    Critter Crazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 19, 2007
    Binghamton, NY
    We have an extension cord running out to our coop. We dont bury it because it isnt always out there, we only use it when we have new chicks.
     
  6. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2007
    Philly, PA
    Yeah, I wouldn't bury it. You can take it up in the summer. [​IMG]

    Now if your trying to put permanent power out there you can get an outdoor 220 line (one of those jointed metal wrapped cords) and run it out there through small PVC piping from your breaker box directly to the coop. THAT you'd need to bury. It isn't hard to do OR expensive (provided you have an empty slot on your breaker box)...I've helped my husband do it, but if you haven't before, you should ask someone who has for assistance, as that's pretty high voltage and can lead to serious injury if you don't know what your doing.
     
  7. cookiesdaddy

    cookiesdaddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 13, 2007
    California Bay Area
    I wouldn't bury the extension cord either. In fact I wouldn't use extension cord outdoor on a "permanent" basis. It's best to use one of those power cable with metal sleeve, and insert it inside PVC pipe. Seal it well to prevent moisture leaking inside. If possible, I would mount it along your fence to the coop, making sure it's visible, with "high voltage" warning label somewhere. That's what I plan to do with my setup.

    I get nervous when people bury electric cable underground without clearly labeling where it is. Someone may inavertently dig into it in the future. Good luck!
     
  8. hypnojessi

    hypnojessi Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 13, 2007
    Troy, MO
    I have looked for them too but have been unsuccessful. But if you were willing to pay a pretty penny, you can get vent-free indoor propane heaters. Try coleman.com or mrheater.com
     
  9. Sherry

    Sherry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2007
    Southern WV
    My barn coop doesn't have power either. I had to use 2 extension cords so of course that meant one connection was outside in the weather. The solution. Ziplock plastic bag. Cut holes in both sides of the bag, put in both ends of cord, plug together, zip bag closed, duct tape the holes around the cord, bam, weatherproof.
    My husband the firefighter taught me that trick.[​IMG]
     
  10. MarkR

    MarkR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2007
    Ivy, Virginia
    Really, though, even in CT you shouldn't need a heater at all, unless you're raising chicks outside. If you were in Alaska, or north of the snow line in VT or NH, I'd say sure, but chickens stay pretty comfortable in some pretty chilly temps. My flock was out digging in the snow this past winter. Now, it was warmer here than in CT for sure, but still, it was in the low 20's at the time.

    Mark
     

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