Is this a crow?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by pookieslw, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. pookieslw

    pookieslw Out Of The Brooder

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    We have an EE and a bunch of Orpingtons, all the same approximate age (12 weeks). The EE is supposed to be a hen (based on wing feather examination by breeder at one day). I've put pictures out here and been told definitely both that she is a hen and that she is a rooster, I've examined her feathers as compared to the Orp hens and roos and have no definitive answer(but leaning towards hen), her behavior is?, so I'm not going there today.

    What new information I have now is that she's started making a noise in the morning. Don't know if it is an immature crow, or a hen pretending to crow. None of the Orp roosters are doing anything of this volume (it's loud). It is a single note like a car horn - definitely not a "cock-a-doodle doo". First few times she did it everyone scattered under the coop to hide.

    Any insights?

    Thanks -

    Sara in Upstate NY
     
  2. 4 luv of eggs

    4 luv of eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It sounds exactly like he's beginning to crow. My SLW roo started that pathetic car horn a few weeks ago. It was sporadic at first but now he crows every morning. It sounds more like a proper crow now. Funny though, the others still run back into the coop when he starts up.[​IMG]
     
  3. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    If it sounds like someone strangling a trombone player, it's a crow. It takes a while to get the more cock-a-doodle-doo sound.
     
  4. pookieslw

    pookieslw Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Oh ACK! ACK ACK ACK!!!!!

    I don't think anything that came from this breeder was right! We got a sickness introduced from her chickens, lost two out of five that came from her (plus some Orps), one bantam is not a bantam. We have one very sweet other bantam though.

    The EE is one of the kids' "pets". I was hoping to have my BOrps self perpetuate. I guess I will have a mix of EE and BOrp offspring now.....maybe someday, somewhere down the line we'll get a green egg from someone. My daughter was really looking forward to the green eggs. Now, at least I know why the EE is a bit more aggressive then my Orp hens - not with us so far. And he'd better not, because I can't stewpot him....

    Does anyone know how domininant/recessive that green egg gene is? Any chance offspring will give green eggs?

    Sara
     
  5. pookieslw

    pookieslw Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:[​IMG]

    My brother plays trombone. We always said it sounded like a sick cow when he was first learning!
     
  6. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    OH boy! (No pun intended) but that sounds like you've got a cockerel that is beginning to crow.....at first it sounds so funny when they crow! Just like you described.....
     
  7. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:Green eggs are blue eggs with a brown coating on them. The blue egg gene is dominant, but with an EE you don't know what you'll end up with. If hatched to another EE, you'd probably get some birds with a pea comb (which is closely tied to the blue egg gene) and some with straight combs. Just keep any pullet with a pea comb, and your chances are better at getting colored eggs of some sort. Cross with a dark laying breed (marans, welsummer, penedesenca's) and you could get olive green colored eggs.
     
  8. pookieslw

    pookieslw Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Quote:Green eggs are blue eggs with a brown coating on them. The blue egg gene is dominant, but with an EE you don't know what you'll end up with. If hatched to another EE, you'd probably get some birds with a pea comb (which is closely tied to the blue egg gene) and some with straight combs. Just keep any pullet with a pea comb, and your chances are better at getting colored eggs of some sort. Cross with a dark laying breed (marans, welsummer, penedesenca's) and you could get olive green colored eggs.

    Thank you! I had done a little research since asking the question, but hadn't come across the info regarding the pea comb. I am mostly interested in breeding for temperment, then dual purpose. I have a little bantam who people are saying may have wyandotte in her. She is the SWEETEST bird, VERY friendly and calm (and I have Buff Orps, who are very calm to begin with). I've been doing research on Wyandottes and may add some next spring, if they are all as sweet as this bantam! Of course, then there's the meat aspect of a friendly bird.......
     
  9. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

    39,750
    1,253
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    Jul 9, 2009
    Northern CA
    My Coop
    Quote:Green eggs are blue eggs with a brown coating on them. The blue egg gene is dominant, but with an EE you don't know what you'll end up with. If hatched to another EE, you'd probably get some birds with a pea comb (which is closely tied to the blue egg gene) and some with straight combs. Just keep any pullet with a pea comb, and your chances are better at getting colored eggs of some sort. Cross with a dark laying breed (marans, welsummer, penedesenca's) and you could get olive green colored eggs.

    Thank you! I had done a little research since asking the question, but hadn't come across the info regarding the pea comb. I am mostly interested in breeding for temperment, then dual purpose. I have a little bantam who people are saying may have wyandotte in her. She is the SWEETEST bird, VERY friendly and calm (and I have Buff Orps, who are very calm to begin with). I've been doing research on Wyandottes and may add some next spring, if they are all as sweet as this bantam! Of course, then there's the meat aspect of a friendly bird.......

    No problem!

    There's a lot of information about pea combs and the blue egg gene on the olive egger thread. Feel free to join us!
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=131131&p=100
     

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