Is this always true when sexing Barred Rock chicks?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by MontanaDolphin, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. MontanaDolphin

    MontanaDolphin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I posted this in the raising baby chicks section, but then I thought I might have better luck here.

    Is it an absolute positive cockerel I.D. if the comb is turning pink? I ask because my babies turned 3 weeks old today, and one of them is absolutely a cockerel (Zeus is his name, and I already knew he was a boy when I got him) because his comb is larger and a definite pink. But there are a couple more that followed the pattern of being pullets (dark fuzz, dark wash down legs), but I'm starting to see a pink tint to their combs as well. Not as bold as Zeus, but the pink is there. I tried to get pics but even in the sunlight, you can't really tell...and with the flash of the camera it's pretty much impossible to tell, but I can try as best as I can to show y'all what I mean. For now, here's this pic...Zeus the bottom right chick...you can kinda see the pink tint to his comb...in reality, it is much brighter/bolder of a pink.


    [​IMG]

    If there's pink in the smaller combs of the couple of other chicks, does that mean the odds are they are cockerels?

    Thanks!!
     
  2. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    boys will have a whiter look to them
     
  3. MontanaDolphin

    MontanaDolphin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yep I know, but i'm wondering about the comb in particular. I know some barred rocks with a whiter look to them...as chicks...turn out to be females. So, I'm wondering if it's a guarantee that if the combs turn pink at my chicks' age, if that means cockerel.
     
  4. SD Bird Lady

    SD Bird Lady Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am curious as well. I have production reds and a few feathered earlier which in a lot of breeds means pullet. Now they are seven weeks and the 3 of them are just now getting a slightly pink comb/ wattle while their male counterparts are obviously boys. I am going to plan on them as male and if they are girls then we will see how they behave and go from there. They are packing peanuts so I assume they are male but thought maybe a few slipped through :)

    ETA: I have only had pea comb chicks before so the single combs all look rooish to me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013
  5. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    I had one that had a very pink, almost red comb at 2 months, well its now laying eggs. But give them a few weeks and you will have your answer between the size and color of combs and wattles and the feather color
     
  6. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    X2. I've had chicks show a pink tinge to the comb at very young ages that were hens. So no, it's not a guarantee. I had a barred rock a couple batches of chicks ago that had me pretty convinced she was a he at a pretty young age, but grew into a very nice hen.
     
  7. MontanaDolphin

    MontanaDolphin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    WHEW!!! Cuz I was seeing wayyyy too many pink combs! Unfortunately, patience isn't one of my strong points...so I think I'm gonna post pics of each of my chicks at three weeks and see if I can get any clues to gender. [​IMG]
     
  8. missnu01

    missnu01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pink, peach and orange aren't the problem colors...when you have an 8 week old chick with a small red comb, that is a cockerel...
     
  9. very cute but I can't tell right from the view. plus they are just chicks, and I am terrible at guessing chick breeds(besides cochins and orphingtons)
     
  10. what do you guys think about the transylvania naked necks?
     

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