Is this bumble foot and how do I treat it?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Goosifer, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Goosifer

    Goosifer Out Of The Brooder

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    This is my Sally Mae. She is a Colombian d'uccle. I really want to help her. It was covered In blood so I washed it with warm water. So far that's all I have done for her ( I brought her Into the warm garage) please help me!
     
  2. Harry Rooster

    Harry Rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    So sorry about your Sally Mae, she must be in pain with this. I hope it is not Bumblefoot. Does it have a hard core on the bottom. From the posts I've read about Bumblefoot, they say that theres a hard core that forms on the bottom (pad) of the foot, that has to be cut open and removed, but they didn't say anything about blood, so I don't know. But someone on here probably will have a better idea. If theres blood, that must mean there's a wound, and if there is a wound, that would indicate to me a possible bacterial infection. How long has it been swelled? It didn't just happen all of a sudden did it? Anyway what they always say, is to soak it in warm Epsom Salt water, to draw out some of the infection, and for relief. It will make her feel better. When I soaked my chicken's foot the other day, she felt better and enjoied her soak, I also put some Apple Cider Vinegar in the water also because it helps also. (I put it in my own bathwater sometimes). You can also put some peroxide in there and you could also put some peroxide on the foot before the soak too. They say to wrap it in vet wrap you are supposed to be able to get at the Tractor Supply Company store, but you probably won't be going to the store at this hour. I know you must really need help or you wouldn't be on here asking at this time of the morning. If you don't have any of this stuff and can't get it right now, just soak it in warm water with what you do have, and if you can see a wound, put some neosporin on it, or antibiotic cream (don't use any other antibiotic creams with pain relief in it because supposedly it is toxic to chickens, but neosporin with pain relief is not because they use another kind of pain relief ingredient that is okay). I have been using neosporin with pain relief on my roosters face where he scratched himself by his ear, and it is almost completely healed up, with no problems. Just for the time being, I would just do the soak and ointment, and be sure to keep her warm and away from the others so they won't bother or peck her. Good Luck with her, and I hope someone who knows more will soon answer you. If it is a bacterial infection, someone on here who knows about these things said Pennicillin injection is the best to treat with, (but they say you can treat chickens with some other kinds of people antibiotics also). Soak with warm Epsom Salt water would help her a lot though, I'm pretty sure of that.
     
  3. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bumblefoot usually originates on the sole of the foot. Do you see any injury there? I could be very wrong, but this looks like a different kind of injury.

    My advice is ditto Harry Rooster.


    I would soak in warm water & apply Neosporin 2-4 times a day and see how she does for a day or two.
    If it doesn't seem to improve quickly enough, Penicillin helps treat some kinds of wounds & perhaps that or another internal antibiotic would be appropriate, too.
    Best wishes!
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  4. gothicangelnico

    gothicangelnico Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You might actually have some infected and/or ingrown feathers. If you aint squeemish about blood I could tell you how to treat. First I just would wrap her up in a towel with her feet out. Numb the spot with ice and with a pin or needle make a tiny slit over any part that looks yellowish. This will either lance it and get the infection out or allow you to see what the cause is. Rinse with cold water and soak in epsom salt. If there is heavy bleeding, press the area hard with a towel or dip in a bowl of cornstarch and/or flour to help stop the bleeding.
    My little silkie roo has been having bad issues with ingrown foot feathers since he started getting them in. He is so used to this procedure now and is relieved when I get the ingrowns out. Sadly the areas started looking tumor-ish and I had to actually wrap him in the towel, numb, and slice those areas off with a blade. Blood was everywhere but it was kind of like "Proud-Flesh" on a horse when they get injured. Lots of blood vessels and such. Then pressing with a towel I held the blade over a flame and then cauterized the wound. Then I spread some neosporin on it and wrapped it with gauze and cut strips of sports-med tape. Kept him inside over night and changed the bandages daily.
    If you do see ingrown feathers and there's not much blood, use a needle to try and get them out a bit. Even pull them out if they are loose and infected with tweezers. This is not for the squeemish and faint of heart!
    This is the best advice I can give regarding issues with ingrown foot feathers. No one else has been able to give me answers so I had to make it up as I go with everything I know about wound dressing etc.
    Good luck!
     

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