Is this environment detrimental?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by buckabucka, Dec 17, 2011.

  1. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    I bought 6 (roughly 5 month old) pullets from someone I don't really know, and want to keep them in quarantine for perhaps a month before introducing them to my flock of 22.

    Right now, they are housed in a large (20x24') hoop house in my garden. They are confined to about 1/3 of the space by poultry netting. It is a good-sized space with 10 feet of height. My concern is humidity. It is definitely more humid in there than it is outdoors. Ice forms on the ceiling overnight, and then drips during the day as temperatures rise. It's not super wet or anything, just somewhat humid.

    Tonight will be 11 degrees, and I wonder if the cold temperatures and humid air are a problem. Is there anything to worry about, other than frostbite? I'd like to keep these birds in there at least 2 more weeks.

    I appreciate any advice!
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    I have a greenhouse with a hutch in it that I use for quarantine and growing out chicks sometimes.

    It grows mold on the poo in the hutch poo catch tray. So what I do is raise some of the sides of it when I have chickens in there. It is really a cheap greenhouse with hoops sold on amazon for $80 (6 x 12) and I have it draped over my dog kennel run. I use bungee cords to roll up the corners and secure them to the chainlink.

    In the summer I have shade cloth that I put over it. But if it is really warm outside I have to move the chickens out. So my answer is to ventilate ventilate ventilate but keep them with a wind shield.

    You don't want their food to become moldy. I'd only put a day's worth in there at a time.
     
  3. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks. It doesn't seem to be so wet as to cause moldy food, although they have only been in there for 2 weeks now. I have seen some mold where the carrots were growing, though, so it's a possibility.
    Perhaps we can find a way to let more air in. There are good-sized cracks around the doors, but that may not be enough. I am tempted to move them to the coop, as they all appear healthy, but I've read that it can take awhile for disease to show.
     
  4. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Quote:I would not shorten your quarantine. Just be on the lookout for moldy food as that can cause death in chickens. Better for them to live in there than ruin your flock.

    I know you didn't ask, but be on the lookout for the need to worm!! In fact, I'd worm them, since they are older than 18 weeks. And dust for mites.

    I have been there done that with worms being introduced to my land from another flock. I had to worm them repeatedly to get rid of them.

    (LOL I am one of the ones here on BYC who are constantly telling folks to worm their flocks so take that with a grain of salt if you wish.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2011
  5. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    My understanding is that inadequate ventilation is hard on their respiratory systems and can make them more susceptible to respiratory infections. Is there a way to add ventilation at the top of one of the end walls? That would help a lot. I wouldn't be worried about those temperatures, with fully feathered and well fed chickens.
     
  6. bigzio

    bigzio Overrun With Chickens

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    Yep X2 on that advice. Keep in mind that chickens hatched and raised in your environment build up a immunity to their surroundings. The 4 weeks in quarantine helps to build the same immunity that your present flock has...in my opinion.

    bigz
     
  7. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for the replies! We're going to add some ventilation and have them stay put for at least another 2 weeks. Hopefully they'll be okay in there for that amount of time. It is better to risk a few birds, rather than risking my whole flock, and if I can control the humidity, the only real risk is predators.
     

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