Is this normal for a black sex-link?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Gindee77, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. Gindee77

    Gindee77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not really too worried about whether or not she's a she...I think she is. I have just never seen one that shows this sort of marking. She's 6 weeks old.

    She has blue-black feathers but lots of them all over her body are tipped with rust-colored quail or partridge colored markings. Here are some photos...I know they usually have brown markings on their breasts and she has those too but are these other markings normal for a black sex-link pullet?

    [​IMG]

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  2. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    I don't know if it's normal or not, but one of my black sex link pullets has shiny blue where yours has red!
     
  3. angelmarie

    angelmarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yep perfectly normal mine has the same thing
    [​IMG]
     
  4. dangerouschicken

    dangerouschicken Will Barter For Coffee

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    Totally normal. I have two that both have varying degrees of red on their black feathers. The one that is mostly black is Erica Estrada. The one with the protrusion of red feathering is Stephanie Powers. [​IMG]
     
  5. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    she looks like mine....one of mine has feathers like that..with the red tipping.....the other is mostly all black..i was wondering if one of mine was a roo also...so i'm glad to see yours..thanks, Wendy
     
  6. Gindee77

    Gindee77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Whew...I'm glad to know my little hen isn't some genetically errant roo!!
     
  7. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Whew...I'm glad to know my little hen isn't some genetically errant roo!!

    Would it shock you to know that sex-links are basic genetic manipulations. Mutations with a purpose, if you will. Most all of the birds we know are encouraged "mutations."​
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2008
  8. Gindee77

    Gindee77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Would it shock you to know that sex-links are basic genetic manipulations. Mutations with a purpose, if you will. Most all of the birds we know are encouraged "mutations."

    Haha...you're right! But the keyword in my post was "errant". Most of the mutations we have in poultry are there by design. I was afraid I had a changeling or something! That maybe some wicked fairy had replaced my genetically manipulated little hen for a mutant roo. Albeit a pretty roo! [​IMG]
     
  9. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    You're right. The word errant is telling.

    If we're to split hairs, most of the exotic breeds we know and love (and many now commonly mundane) originated as "sports," otherwise known as mutations.
    Some were regressives or throwbacks to some distant ancestor, unknown yet stirring around in the genetic coup. Not really mutations in the strict sense, but certainly unlike the parent stock in any regard.
    Others are just flat out random genome shifts, outright mutations.
    It wasn't as easy to get to predictability as some may think.

    Can't you imagine how it must have gone - -
    There were two birds, bred together, and the result was something like:

    "Oh, look at THAT one. Lets keep that going!"

    But however you got it, you did end up with a nice looking little bird, there.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2008
  10. Gindee77

    Gindee77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Or genetic coop... Or genetic soup. It was quite a coup to get what you wanted in the coop from the genetic soup. That's for sure. "Hmmm let's see, should I use the homozygous male or the dominant female or the spotted hen with the purple polkadots?"

    How do you get another of a certain line to be just like a sport? Hmmmm. Interesting points to ponder!

    I'm just glad she's a she and I hope she will always remain a she! I hope she keeps her cute red-tipped feathers too!
     

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