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Is this normal?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by kamrynwade, May 1, 2016.

  1. kamrynwade

    kamrynwade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a 5 month old white Plymouth Rock rooster. He follows me around the coop everywhere I go and if I'm not watching he will nip at my fingers or basically anywhere. Is this normal or will it get worse?
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It may become worse. Convince him that you are BOSS and he is subordinate. It doesn't have to be abusive. Spray him with a spray bottle, place a hand on his back and the other on his neck/head and force him firmly to the ground, scoop him up in a short handled fishing net - anything to prove that you are in charge.
     
  3. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's not what I'd allow as the norm in my flock. I've had roosters before and currently building a flock from chicks right now - if roosters become human aggressive they're sent away to someone's freezer (vegetarian here but there's always someone willing to take a meal) or to a new home (although I dislike rehoming aggressive roosters into a breeding flock). If it worsens, I would put an end to it.
     
  4. azygous

    azygous Overrun With Chickens

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    No, it's not "normal". But I'd rather say it's not "desirable".

    What you want in a cockerel's behavior is for him to keep a respectful distance from you at all times, and should he find himself in your path, he gets out of your way immediately.

    A cockerel that behaves as yours is will probably get worse. He follows you because he doesn't trust you. He bites you because he doesn't respect you. If you are planning to keep him, you need to train him to see you as someone worthy of respect and trust. Note that I said "train", not "punish".

    I had a cockerel like yours that would take deep plugs of flesh from my hands and legs whenever I entered his space. It took a full year of rehabilitation to change this behavior. He did turn out to be a very well behaved rooster for the remaining of his three years of life.

    You need to assess whether or not your cockerel is worth the effort to rehab, and then commit to the time and energy it's going to require. Or re-home him.
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    He's learned that you are a pushover, and MIGHT become respectful if you change your behavior and demand respect. If he gets worse is spite of retraining efforts, he will make a good meal for someone. Cockrels need to respect your space always, and get out of your way as you move through the flock. I make a point of walking 'through' my birds, and expecting them to move away from my path. At least, learn from this experience, so your next cockrels behave better. If he's human aggressive, nobody will be safe around him, especially children. Mary
     
  6. kamrynwade

    kamrynwade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It got worse today. What are things I can do to try and change his behavior?
     
  7. kamrynwade

    kamrynwade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It got worse today... Any more suggestions on how to make him know who's boss?
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    You can try to move him out of your way, maybe with a broom or something to keep him further from your legs. Some people have success with a squirt bottle or squirt gun; nail him when he gives you that 'look' or doesn't move away fast enough, don't wait for an attack. you need to get him when he's thinking bad thoughts! I think it's unlikely that he'll work out for you, and recommend that he goes away ASAP. Mary
     
  9. kamrynwade

    kamrynwade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes the spray bottle worked!! But yeah if he continues to be agressive I gave my dad permission to eat.... Him.... Plus I have another rooster that acts perfectly who could take his place. if I kick my other rooster out of the flock would he become just as agressive or would he stay the same?
     
  10. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    Your other rooster might be fine, or not. Time will tell. Only good boys get to stay here and reproduce. Mary
     

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