Is this true on Plymouth Rock chickens ?

JULIE L CORWIN

In the Brooder
May 17, 2017
66
10
46
Just read that white Plymouth Rocks develope a downy like feather under thier original feathers for winter to keep them warmer in winter. That if heat lamps are used. They don't develope this. Also they don't live that long. They can't keep up with the body growing and they just basically drop over and die. I realize chickens die from diffrent things. Do barred rocks do the same thing? How long do they live?
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
25,446
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777
Southeast Louisiana
Could you give a link to where you read that? I think Cindy nailed it, they are talking about the Cornish Rock, Conrish X, Cornish Cross (whatever you call them), a meat bird, totally different from regular Rocks.
 

sue25

Songster
Apr 25, 2017
1,095
1,460
242
Hephzibah GA
Could you give a link to where you read that? I think Cindy nailed it, they are talking about the Cornish Rock, Conrish X, Cornish Cross (whatever you call them), a meat bird, totally different from regular Rocks.
Thank goodness. I have 2 young barred rocks I hope they live for a long time.
 

sassysarah

Crossing the Road
Apr 3, 2017
4,221
9,453
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Oklahoma
My Coop
Are you sure you aren't thinking about Cornish cross meat birds? Never heard of white rocks being different from any other rocks.
Could you give a link to where you read that? I think Cindy nailed it, they are talking about the Cornish Rock, Conrish X, Cornish Cross (whatever you call them), a meat bird, totally different from regular Rocks.
X3
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
26,872
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
All birds have a downy coat under the outer feathers. The issue with heat lamps is that the birds don't get acclimated to the cold weather, so if you have a lamp failure, or a power outage, they are at extra risk from the cold. Heat lamps are also a fire hazard. Can I ask why you are considering a heat lamp for cold weather? I'm in zone 4, and never use heat UNLESS, the weather has been below 0*F (which it sometimes does for days and weeks on end), AND my birds are showing signs of hypothermia: not eating as much (when they should be eating more) and not moving much. Ventilation is important in the coop in both the warmest and the very coldest weather.
 

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