Isolated Enough From Fowl Pox?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by juliecox, Oct 31, 2009.

  1. juliecox

    juliecox Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 27, 2009
    Arlington, TX
    I wanted to ask about two young birds who may have been exposed to Fowl Pox. Two weeks ago, I put two chicks (about 2 months old now, fully feathered) outside in a coop by themselves with a heat lamp for the chilly nights. Today, two of my four adult birds are showing definite signs of fowl pox. What I had mistaken for mosquito bites are now looking warty. It's definitely the dry pox, not wet pox. All birds are eating and drinking normally, and are being given extra treats like plain yogurt, scrambled eggs and lots, lots of fresh water.

    My question is, are the two previously mentioned chicks at all protected from the fowl pox by not being allowed to physically mix with the sick birds? Or is being in the same yard close enough proximity that they would be exposed too? The chicks are complaining loudly about not being allowed to scratch. I just want to see if I'm doing any good by keeping them cooped.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I'm not sure of the answer about the exposure with the chicks, but fowl pox will run its course in a couple of weeks and is not a carrier disease. They were probably mosquito bites since that is how fowl pox is spread. You can treat the lesions with iodine, but eventually, they'll heal up anyway. The dry form is one of the least worrisome things to have go through the flock, IMO, though you can vaccinate for it.
     
  3. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Fowl pox is spread by mosquitoes, not via air. If the mosquitos can get to them both, they are at risk. However, fowl pox is rarely a big deal. Only if it infects the mucous membranes (becomeing wet pox) is it a real concern.

    I personally separate ill birds from the ones who show no symptoms as it can be spread through direct contact (pecking, scratching, biting). Spray all areas where mosquitoes congregate with a pesticide such as malathion that is effective at killing mosquitoes, and remove all standing water. If there is any such as a ponfd that cannot be empties, use Mosquito Dunks. Nightly spray each coop with mosquito repellant such as you would put on yourself. Put iodine on all lesions to help dry them up. Consider whether you want to give a prophylactic antibiotic in their water. If any develop lesion in hteir throat or mouth, swab with listerine at least twice daily, removing as much of the cheesy material as possible (to prevent it growing to the extent of blocking breathing/eating/drinking). It will bleed and be uncomfortable to painful, but is necessary.
     
  4. juliecox

    juliecox Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 27, 2009
    Arlington, TX
    Ah ... well if it's spread through mosquito bites, probably not doing a dang bit of good by keeping those two youngsters by themselves during the day, huh? Seeing as how their coop is so nice and ventilated, and open to mosquitoes! XD
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Logically, yep, not going to help keep them separate from each other if the mosquitoes are everywhere, LOL. I'm surprised that we haven't had fowl pox here with all the humidity and skeeters in Ga.
     
  6. juliecox

    juliecox Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 27, 2009
    Arlington, TX
    I'll keep an eye on them, make sure it doesn't turn into wet pox. I think I will keep the little guys separated, for my own mental well-being if for no other reason, even if it's not really helping that much.
     

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