It's almost time! Duck buyers unite!

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Bridger Davis, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. Bridger Davis

    Bridger Davis Songster

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    Evans Colorado
    Hey everyone! It just dawned on me that in a few months, it will be time to buy ducks!!! I thought anyone buying ducks in the coming spring could use this thread to ask questions and we can all help each other out! I'll start it off with my first question. What can be done now to prepare for my ducks that are likely coming in March?
     
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  2. GeoGreyWolf

    GeoGreyWolf Songster

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    Great idea for a thread, can help us newbies learn about ducks more.
     
    Bridger Davis likes this.
  3. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    I'm joining in. I found an old duck/chick schedule tucked in a book the other day and saw that my local feed store first had them in February last year! That's really not too far off. Currently I only have chickens, so my big question is, what do I need to feed them? or how do I need to feed them differently than my chickens? I know the nutritional needs of ducks are different, and I have chicken feed on hand, so is it easier to add to/supplement the existing chicken feed and feed it to ducks? or buy different feed for the ducks? or buy something different that both the ducks and chickens can eat?
     
  4. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    Also how much brooder space per duckling is needed? As in, what's the max space they will need indoors at the end of brooding when they are biggest and about ready to move outside?
     
  5. According to Storey's Guide to Raising Ducks,

     
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  6. GeoGreyWolf

    GeoGreyWolf Songster

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    From what i read the major difference in ducks and chickens is the Niacin. My ducks after i bought a bad batch, I started giving niacin to them in their drinking water. The feed i started to use is Purina starter for my ducklings.
     
    Bridger Davis likes this.
  7. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    Do you add Niacin their whole life or just while growing? What food do you like now that they are grown?
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    Chick starter can be fed but use unmediated and provide a poultry vitamin in the water..Chick starter and vitamins till two or 3 weeks and then find a feed that is also recommended for Ducks...
     
  9. GeoGreyWolf

    GeoGreyWolf Songster

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    Mixed feelings about this, I have used chick starter medicated with no problems. It even talks about medicated in Storey's Guide about using it (with other options too) which is like the bible for duck raising. I use the starter feed and now on the flock raiser and will start using layer feed mixed with it, all purina brand. When it came to medicated the ducklings I did not use medicated with were my problem ones but could of been bad genetics, niacin deficient as well. I supplemented niacin in their water, I still give them some now (not an expert on it). The ducklings I have used with medicated feed, I had no problems what so ever. If there is a reason not for ducks to be medicated please educate me, from the posts I have seen there is no proof against it.
     
    Bridger Davis likes this.
  10. Bridger Davis

    Bridger Davis Songster

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    Niacin is mainly for development. After they are fully grown,( I would say at about 6-9 weeks) they should no longer need niacin. A general rule of thumb for feed is that they need a 20% protein starter chick feed with brewer's yeast for niacin for the first ten weeks of their lives. Then, they need a 15% protein grower for 10-18 weeks old. Finally, you will use a layer feed with 16% protein for the rest of their lives after 18 weeks. In a separate container or mixed in with the feed, oyster shell should be made available. Personally, I would stick with a non-medicated chicken feed because ducks eat more than chickens and they could over-medicate themselves. All that I have read suggests against medicated chick feed. Do your own research though and decide for yourself. Hope this helps! Looking forward to ordering my babies in early Jan and hopefully getting them in March! :ya:ya:ya:ya:ya:jumpy:jumpy:jumpy
     
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