It's true, I hate my chick :(

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bellz15, Jul 12, 2019 at 10:50 AM.

  1. bellz15

    bellz15 Chirping

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    I'm raising 3 chicks, two wyandottes and a wellsummer, they're all about 6 weeks right now. I've spent HEAPS of time with them, nearly an hour or more most days for 5 weeks straight. The wyandottes are extremely sweet, loving and comfortable with me. They're also polite and happily feed side by side. The wellsummer however is a tyrant. She jumps on the other two, pushes them off perches and shoves them out of the way of food (my poor gold laced gives up trying) . She hates me, making a scene if I so much as go close. She tries to peck me in the eye regularly and succeeded once, and I swear she looks at me like she wants me to burn in the fiery pits of hell.

    She's always been like this, but I treated her for pasty butt at about 2 weeks (it took less than 5 mins) and I'm wondering if she still remembers that and hates me because of it. I've read that wellsummers are extremely friendly and wyandottes are meant to be the bullies. I just keep telling myself 'think of the pretty eggs she'll lay'!

    Is it uncommon to get rid of a perfectly good hen because of their turd-ish personality? Will she grow out of it? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    How sure are you that that is a female? At six weeks you might be able to tell. Could you post photos showing the head up close, mainly comb and wattles. Also a profile shot showing legs and posture.
     
  3. Sea Wolf

    Sea Wolf Songster

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    She might come around .. maybe not. Maybe she will be a power layer in trade.
     
  4. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    After I finished drying my tears of laughter, I can now respond!!
    Her personality will change somewhat when she reaches sexual maturity.
    Unfortunately, chickens are individual and their personalities don't always conform to what is documented as standard.
    I have two Welsummers and two Wyandottes, one silver laced and one gold laced. They are just shy of 11 weeks old. I can touch the GLW, but that's it. The SLW, Alecia, enjoys jumping into my lap and will allow me to pet her a little, but her full name is Alecia the Finger Pecker. Boy does she love that!
    One Welsummer, Lola, is a sweetie and will allow me to pick her up, put her on my lap and pet her. Lola had a case of pasty butt and constipation I dealt with when she was a week old but she did not hold it against me when I cleaned her up. My second Welsummer, is Torvi, named after a viking shield maiden as she is a holy terror to the others. That's just way the personalities laid out.
    I do not force contact with my chicks. I would sit on the floor in the coop when they were about the age yours are now and allow them to run across and jump up on my legs at their will. I would offer them treats and let them come to me or not.
    Your little tyrant may soften but it just sounds like she is the head of the group and means business about it.
    I'd put out at least two feed stations so the Wyandottes have a place to eat away from her.
    Good luck.
     
  5. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Crowing

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    I had a chick like that a couple years ago. I called her Butthead because she was so mean to the other chicks. Eventually "she" started to crow and I figured out what the problem was. He was never a nice rooster, but he made a delicious broth.:lau
     
  6. bellz15

    bellz15 Chirping

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    I will take some photos in the morning, thank you. Wellsummers are sex-linked so I am fairly certain she is a she, but it did cross my mind. She has no wattles and her comb is absolutely yellow but they're changing every day at this point so I will definitely grab some pics :)
     
    Eggscaping, Ridgerunner and ValerieJ like this.
  7. bellz15

    bellz15 Chirping

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    Ahah let's hope so!
     
    Eggscaping and ValerieJ like this.
  8. Mybackyardpeepers

    Mybackyardpeepers Crowing

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    I have a barred rock pulley that tries to Peck eyes when she is on our shoulders. I don't really think the breed deciferes personality more than individual chicks decides their personalities.
     
  9. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    Every chicken has a different personality. Also, as others have mentioned, often their personalities change once they hit maturity/start laying. Also you have to learn to respect boundaries and not push your luck. Some birds don't like being handled, period, and no amount of handling will turn those birds into lap chickens, in fact, it may just stress them out and upset them more. I have some birds I can easily catch and pick up and others that run for their lives. They were all raised the same. I don't mess with the timid ones, and as long as I ignore them, they actually will follow me around to see what's going on. Hopefully you and your birds will all learn to get along. That being said, if once they all hit maturity, if you still have a serious bully issue on your hands and the one is beating up the others, you may have to face the difficult decision of what to do with the bully. I'd give it time. Also, once they are out of the brooder and have more space and more interesting things to do, conflicts between the chickens may improve.
     
  10. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    "tries to Peck eyes when she is on our shoulders."

    See, this is where differences in handling come into play. Personally, I'd never in a million years try to put a chicken on my shoulders, especially one that tries to peck eyes, that one would forever be on the ground. Everyone's handling is different and expectations of their chickens is different. Be prepared to change your expectations of your chickens based on their different personalities.
     

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