1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Ivermectin dosing

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by MendonMan, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. MendonMan

    MendonMan Out Of The Brooder

    46
    1
    34
    Jan 31, 2012
    I have 2 Buff Orps and 2 Barred Rock hens. All are not laying now (molting). I'd like to administer a dose of Ivermectin.

    From what I read on these forums I can administer a drop onto their skin on the neck (anywhere there is bare skin really), right?

    Also, I see many different forms of it; paste, pour-on, and injection. It appears this is the oil:

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/iverontrade;-parasiticide-5-l

    For me, something from Tractor Supply is the easiest for me to get to.

    I want to make sure I'm getting the right stuff.

    And I don't have to dose it again? Just the once (this fall). And then not use any eggs for 2 weeks?

    Thanks,

    Charles
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,204
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    I dont recommend worming during molt. Birds in molt are already under enough stress as it is. Wait to worm when molt is complete. I dont recommend using ivermectin for worming. It has lost its effectiveness as a wormer in chickens. Consider purchasing valbazen liquid cattle/sheep wormer or safeguard liquid goat wormer to worm your birds when they are finished molt.
     
  3. MendonMan

    MendonMan Out Of The Brooder

    46
    1
    34
    Jan 31, 2012
    Sounds good but please tell me proper dosing. Thanks.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,204
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    For either valbazen or safeguard liquids, administer orally undiluted using a syringe without a needle. Dosage is 1/2cc orally for standard size chickens, 1/4cc for smaller chickens. Redose again in 10 days using either wormer. There's a 14 day withdrawal period after last dosing.
     
  5. Ashdoes

    Ashdoes Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,724
    133
    168
    Jun 11, 2012
    Peyton, CO
    Why do you have to re-dose? Just something I've been wondering anytime I read about worming.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

    32,703
    5,462
    556
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    To get every life stage of parasite......first dose kills adults, second dose kills hatched eggs first dose doesn't get...I think.
     
  7. Ashdoes

    Ashdoes Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,724
    133
    168
    Jun 11, 2012
    Peyton, CO
    That kind of makes sense. I just hate having to dose the birds so much, when one dose could possible take care of the full problem. If Valbazen is so much better then the rest, shouldn't it be killing eggs to adults?
    Just trying to learn all I can, not trying to be rude or anything....I know people are pretty sensitive about worming vs not worming.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,204
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    There are no wormers that will wipe out eggs. Some types of worm eggs can survive in soil for many years even under extreme temperature/weather changes. Also, wormers dont have a 100% kill rate in the first dosing. Some types of wormers have a higher kill ratio on various types of worms than others with the first dosing, valbazen has the highest kill ratio of all wormers and kills all known types of worms that chickens can get. A second worming 10 days later ensures a 100% kill ratio that the first worming may have missed, as in larva hatched from eggs....as aart mentioned in post #6.
    Here's a link as to the effectiveness of valbazen (albendazole.) Note the first time kill ratio on various types of worms by the albendazole; then you'll know why a second worming is needed:
    http://japr.fass.org/content/16/3/392.full.pdf
    Also note the JAPR report towards the bottom of the page.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  9. Ashdoes

    Ashdoes Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,724
    133
    168
    Jun 11, 2012
    Peyton, CO
    Thank you so much. That was very helpful.
    It makes sense that if the chemical doesn't kill the eggs, you have to wait for them to hatch to then kill the parasite.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by