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Ivermectin/noromectin use for scaley leg mites/other mites

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ziegenhof, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. Ziegenhof

    Ziegenhof Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 11, 2012
    Southern Oregon
    Little background, I've been in search for a rooster for my hens for awhile and well folks have "found me a rooster".. Which has resulted in some interesting offers. Well one of those offers was a poor rooster who I felt bad for. A local elderly gentleman who has raised rare poultry for a number of years, has gotten to the point he can't care for his animals anymore and one of the gals helping him to re home his beloved poultry, brought home a Cochin rooster for me to use in my flock.

    Well he also had a girlfriend that came with him, and some extra critters attached it would appear. Both have scaly leg mites (he has a really bad case), both are pretty bare and I'm going to assume have mites as they are constantly picking themselves. I've dusted both with DE, have them in quarantine, and used Vet Rx on their legs (wanted to try it first as it seems to work really well on ear mites).

    I don't know the ages on this couple but I'm going to say they are on the more senior end of chicken life (although the hen did sup rise me with laying some eggs). I need to get some pictures of these two but so far they are pretty spastic around people, and every time I get close to them they start flying all over their limited space quarantine pen. I'm trying to keep them calm with no stress and a good diet to help rehab them.

    So was thinking of using something quicker to treat their feet then trying to bath the legs, and applying a product several times to their legs which just stresses them out more. Hence the the question on using one of the mectin products for mites. I know it's not labeled for poultry use but seems vets have been Rxing it. With like a one drop orally dosage once (not sure if they are repeating in 10 days?). Was wondering for those that have gone this route how it has worked for your chickens? And about how long it takes to see improvement in both the legs and skin?

    Thanks!
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I just tried it as an oral drench on two of mine that have mites. It's been several days since I gave it to them and they both still have mites. They both weigh about 1kg and they both got about one drop from a 1cc syringe. I'd also like to hear what others are doing with ivermectin.
     
  3. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Invermectin should work - i'd prob use the pour on one instead of oral and you can apply close to the infested area.

    Dosage would be 0.5-0.75 ml/cc for a standard sized bird, prob 0.5 for the hen and 0.75 for the rooster. Not sure what the oral dose would be. As a bonus the invermectin will worm them too! Withdraw the eggs a few days too, not sure how many days for invermectin.

    I have used Eprinex on my chickens with great success.
     
  4. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i think the dose for that would be 0.25-0.4 ml/cc. not sure what 1 drop is in terms of measurement. It sounds like you might not have given enough?

    I have only used Eprinex pour on, and this has worked for me. Not sure if the oral is less effective than the pour on (it shouldn't, you would think?)
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Thanks... I started off with a very low cc to kg ratio just to be safe, but will probably try increasing it. Too bad I have a brand new, full bottle of the water base stuff, lol.
     
  6. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have used the ivomec pour on with good success but I also went out at night and dipped the legs in vegetable oil. Coat the combs and wattles too as they can (rarely but does happen) infest them there. I only dipped three times a week apart and they did fine. The scales do not recover right away so you cannot tell by looking if they are still there or not. The ones I worked on were at a heritage farm type place and they were in really bad shape.
     
  7. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i am not sure the oral is not as effective; based on how it works, it should be, i think you just need a higher dose than you gave. My understanding is that it's fairly safe even at multiples of the recommended dose.

    Though do check that the pour on and oral have the some concentration... you might need to adjust!
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I know it's very safe in horses, but you're not supposed to give it to Collie type dogs and cats get very little, I think. I'd rather be safe than sorry, so fear not, I will do more research. It should work orally, like it does in horses (gets almost all internal parasites, mites and lice). I just need to know what the normal mg or cc to kg ratio is.
     
  9. Ziegenhof

    Ziegenhof Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 11, 2012
    Southern Oregon
    One of the reasons I posted is I've heard that it's used for chickens but unsure of correct one to use, inject-able as oral or pour on.

    I just spoke with a caprine Veterinarian expert as I raise goats, and he stated that the injectables should only be used orally as under medicating has led to resistance and pour on is not reliable just due to differences in absorption based on a number of factors.

    So I didn't know if the same would apply to poultry as I just don't think it's been used as often on them, and I'm betting they absorb better then goats do.

    Anyways wanted to add a couple of pictures of Rescue 1 and 2... Pictures actually make them looked feathered from standing above them, where is if you pick them up the feathers are off the neck, undersides, back near tail and the vent area is super naked for both. And you can tell sorta that they use to have leg feathers but only because some quills are left, otherwise they are gone as well now. I was told these are blue Cochins. But looks like the roo is a splash and the hen she is really light and looks more like a lavender color?
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  10. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With the pour on, you have to make sure it goes right on the skin, not the feathers. I have applied it in the evening while they were on the roost... much easier and no squirming. roughly speaking 0.50-0.75 cc for standards, 0.35-0.50 ccs for bantams, repeat in 10 days.
     

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