Ivermectin vs. Eprinex dosage confusion

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jplivermore, Jan 28, 2014.

  1. jplivermore

    jplivermore New Egg

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    I wormed with Wazine on the 18th and need to do a broad spectrum wormer now as a follow up. I've read about both dosages on here and they differ from one another. I've basically read that when using Ivermectin you dose the birds by a certain number of drops. And with Eprinex you use more, as in 1/2cc or 1/4cc. I was going to use Eprinex tonight but when I filled up the syringe to 1/2cc it looked like a lot to use compared to the Ivermectin dosage of 5 drops for my size of chickens. Do you use more when using Eprinex? Or is 1/2cc comparable to 5 drops?


    Ivermectin Dosage

    1 drop OEGB female
    2 drops OEGB male
    3 drops average bantams i usually do 4
    4 drops large bantam
    5 drops most commercial fowl
    6 drops giant breeds


    Eprinex Dosage

    1/4cc Bantams
    1/2cc Standard
    3/4cc Large

    Also, can I worm my ducks with either wormers?

    And what do you folks prefer between the two wormers. Ivermectin or Eprinex?

    Just to confirm, I know to use the pour on 5% of both.

    Thanks to anyone who responds.

    Jake
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    FYI, the pour ons are not 5%, they are 5mg/ml. I also used to think they were 5%, so don't feel bad, lol.

    1% = 10mg/ml
    5% = 50mg/ml
    10% = 100mg/ml


    -Kathy
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    And welcome to BYC!
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    The dosages you have are correct. Eprinex "looks" more than ivermectin pour on in the syringe because eprinex is slightly thicker in consistancy than the ivermectin pour on. You'll notice that ivermectin pour on is more "runny" than eprinex. You'll also notice once ivermectin pour on is applied to the skin that it is quickly absorbed through the skin. Eprinex takes a little longer to be absorbed through the skin. Both are effective against mites, but ineffective as wormers in poultry due to their overuse as miteacides in chickens rather than their primary purpose as wormers. In other words, worms are resistant to both products. I recommend using valbazen liquid cattle/sheep wormer or safeguard liquid goat wormer as broad spectrum wormers for your birds. Here's a link regarding the ineffectiveness of ivermectin as a wormer in chickens. Eprinex is the same way, only difference is that there's no withdrawal period using eprinex. Ivermectin pour on normally has a 14 day withdrawal period. Alot of people dont realize this when treating for mites. Here's the link, scroll down:
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1439-0450.1989.tb00635.x/abstract
    I dont know about ducks, never owned them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
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  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I do have ducks and I would use either if I wanted to treat them for mites, but for worming I use Safeguard, though I've been think about getting some Valbazen. [​IMG] Bang for the buck, Valbazen is the better wormer.

    -Kathy
     
  6. jplivermore

    jplivermore New Egg

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    Thanks for all the great info guys. What would be the dosage for valbazen and safeguard? And is it also a pour on type of wormer?
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    From what I have read, the most effective dose for Valbazen is 20mg/kg by mouth, which is ~.2ml per 2.2 pounds. For Safeguard to be almost as effective you have to give it at the same amount for three days in a row, but I usually just give it once at 50mg/ml, which is .5ml per 2.2 pounds. Both of these wormers are meant to be given orally and one should repeat the dose in ten days.

    -Kathy
     
  8. Totalcolour

    Totalcolour Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am curious about the "worm resistance" to Eprinex. Surely, if the drug has been used a lot in a farm environment, then the worms in that area could build resistance. But, if one were to start a farm, on relatively clean land, where no chickens had been previously raised, and with chicks that were raised from hatching eggs, there would be less resistance. Worm resistance has to come from exposure, so if there hasn't been exposure, then one would think that the drug would be effective.

    Am I missing something?
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    You're referring to pasture rotation which may work as study's have shown with sheep, cattle etc...even then, they'll eventually need to be wormed. Chickens on the otherhand are constantly pecking/picking soil where worm occysts are mainly located. Also, insects such as ants, grasshoppers, earthworms etc can harbor infective worm oocysts and chickens love to eat bugs as you know.
    Like ivermectin, eprinex has been primarily used as a miteacide in chickens rather than for its primary purpose as a wormer, why? Because it doesnt have a withdrawal period...and has been misused.
    If you have enough land, perhaps you could experiment with 3 flocks of chickens. Keep the first flock penned up for a year. The second flock free ranging in a good size area without rotating into another area. Then your third flock could be rotated into different areas...free ranging those selected areas. Of course coops would have to be built and so on. It would be challenge but interesting.
    BTW: I know which group would get worms first.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2014

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