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Ivomec Deal or no Deal?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rnorris1234, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. rnorris1234

    rnorris1234 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2010
    Fort Payne, AL
    I think I have a worm problem. I have used wazine, but i have several chickens who are still very very thins and i lost another one this week. They are all eating well -- love when I bring treats, but not adding any weight.
    I was trying to read up about Ivermectin but I am left very very confused. I had looked at TSC back about a month or so ago, but it was way too expensive for my small flock, so I chose the wazine instead. However, I just checked and saw that they had a $75 bottle clearanced to $19.99 so I snatched it up. But I'm not sure it's what I needed so I may have wasted the $20.
    It is Ivomec drench .08% for sheep.
    Does anyone know if this can be used on chickens? What dose? What age is safe? etc.
    The chickens who are so thin are a couple of bantam cochins (although I just lost a LF cochin roo this week) I have LF wyandottes in another pen and they seem fine, but might want to treat as well.

    Thank you for any help you can give.

    Robert
     
  2. ND

    ND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 20, 2010
    Go to TSC, to the horse section. Buy Zimectrin Gold paste for horses. (or any other horse dewormer that states it also targets tapeworms, but Z-gold is usually found) It'll run about $8-13. It'll also target TAPEworms, which just plain Ivermectin will not.
    Dose each bird a pea sized amount. It's pretty safe... has a high 'overdose' threshold, so don't be afraid if your pea sized amount isn't perfectly accurate.
    I squeeze it out onto my finger tip, then scrape it into each bird's beak, one by one. Some people have luck dosing a piece of bread and feeding each bird a piece...but my greedy birds would just crowd everyone else away and take it ALL. [​IMG]

    You'll have some left over if you have a small flock... you can save it (temp control place) for next time.

    *I* would do that, anyway... I'd take back the drench and get the Z-gold. (return, exchange, whatever...our TSC will do that...)

    Someone else may come along and know the dosage for the drench you have... but it won't get tapeworms...
     
  3. BlacksheepCardigans

    BlacksheepCardigans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 11, 2010
    Southeast NH
    A pea-sized amount of Zimectrin would be about a 100X overdose, which is well beyond the margin of safety.

    OP, you can use the sheep drench but the amount is going to be very tiny. Somewhere around one-tenth ml per bird. It's also not that great at treating intestinal worms - great on mites and lice, though. If they'll let you return the drench for something else, the best thing to get for intestinal worms is either Safeguard (fenbendazole) or Valbazen (albendazole).
     
  4. ND

    ND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's pretty much the standard dose size of Z-gold that is recommended on this forum.

    I've used it, in that dosage amount.
    And there's been no adverse reactions, other than dead worms... [​IMG]


    I can't say what % of an 'overdose' it may or may not be...but certainly not 100X. A 100 x's overdose amount would be dosing a 5lb chicken with a 500lb dosage of Z-gold. (a little less than half the entire tube) I ASSURE you, a pea sized amount doesn't use anywhere NEAR the 500lb mark on the tube. Not even close to the 100lb mark...or 50lb dosage...
     
  5. BlacksheepCardigans

    BlacksheepCardigans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The horse dosage is not the same as the chicken dosage. A chicken dosage of regular injectable ivomec is a little over half of one-tenth ml. Five one-hundredths of a ml. Zimectrin is twice as concentrated as ivomec injectable, so its dose for a chicken would be two or three one-hundredths of a ml. What you're giving in a "pea-sized" dose is going to be over a ml, unless your peas are smaller than my peas [​IMG]. It's a HUGE overdose.
     
  6. ND

    ND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd hope the chicken dosage isn't the same as a horse... my horses get at LEAST one entire tube...some of them more... [​IMG]

    I go by weight, roughly. Chicken, horse, whatever. It's actually a guesstimate, since there aren't 5-10lb dosing marks... [​IMG]
    The forum peeps around here recommend pea sized (or even BB sized). I go with that.
    It's actually hard to decide what size pea it IS, since Z gold tends to be a bit runny and not stay in pea shape. [​IMG]

    Dead worms and absolutely no adverse effects in the chickens has been the outcome. [​IMG]
    Perhaps they can be OD's by several more 100 X's... [​IMG]
    I'll use it again, repeatedly so... as needed. [​IMG]

    I wouldn't/couldn't begin to calculate dosage comparisons between injectables and pastes or drenches... or even the % of active ingredients per ml compared to each other in different carrier states. I'm just not smart enough. [​IMG] Nor can I picture what two or three one hundredth's of a ml of that orange paste might look like on my fingertip... so I'm stickin' with the pea sized dose. Minus what ends up outside their beaks... [​IMG]
     
  7. rnorris1234

    rnorris1234 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2010
    Fort Payne, AL
    confused.
     
  8. bigdawg

    bigdawg AA Poultry

    Jun 28, 2009
    middle tenn
    yea me too. i have read so much about worming i have almost went blind. i want to know is there anything other than wazine that you can mix in with there drinking water. anyone. 25+ guineas, 6 turkeys, 60+ chickens all one at a time, at night. it would take me a week if i am lucky. not to mention the beating i would indure.
     
  9. BlacksheepCardigans

    BlacksheepCardigans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can mix panacur (same thing as Safeguard - fenbendazole) granules or paste in with their feed, or levamisole (Tramisole) in water.

    This is from MSU:


    PARASITE (INTERNAL) SOLUTIONS

    The following treatments have been shown to be effective for eliminating internal parasites from poultry and game birds. Neither of these drugs (fenbendazole or leviamisole) has been approved for use by FDA, so the producer accepts all responsibility for their use. Both drugs have been very effective if used properly and will eliminate most types of internal parasites that affect birds. Caution: Do not use with birds producing eggs or meat destined for human consumption.

    Fenbendazole Treatments

    One-day Treatment

    1 oz Safeguard or Panacur per 15-20 lb feed

    Dissolve the fenbendazole product in one cup of water. Mix this solution well into the feed and give to the birds as their only feed source for one day. When completely consumed, untreated feed can be given. Be sure that the commercial medication contains 10% fenbendazole.

    Safeguard is a product of Ralston Purina, and Panacur is a product marketed by American Hoechst. One ounce of medication will treat about 1000 10-oz bobwhite quail. Adjustments of the amounts of medication and feed needed may be necessary depending on the number and size of the birds.

    Three-Day Treatment

    1.2 oz Safeguard or Panacur in 100 lb feed
    -or-
    4 oz pkt of "Worm-A-Rest Litter Pack" (Ralston Purina) in 50 lb feed
    -or-
    5 lb bag of "Worm-A-Rest Mix Pack" in 495 lb feed

    Feed all the medicated feeds free-choice for three consecutive days. The feed mixtures provide 75 ppm fenbendazole. Quail will receive about 1.7 mg/bird each day for adult birds or 2.75 mg/lb of bodyweight.

    Fenbendazole has been shown to be a very effective treatment for eliminating Capillaria (capillary worms), Heterakis (cecal worms), Ascaridia (roundworms), and Syngamus spp. (gapeworms). Toxicity from overdosing with fenbendazole is very remote. Research indicates that amounts up to 100 times the recommended dosages have been given under research conditions without adverse effects to the birds. Use of this product during molt, however, may cause deformity of the emerging feathers.

    Leviamisole Solutions

    52 gram (1.84 oz) pkt Tramisol in 100 gallons water
    -or-
    13 gram (.46 oz) pkt Tramisol in 25 gallons water
    -or-
    52 gram (1.84 oz) pkt in 3 qt water (stock solution)

    Dissolve the 52 gram packet of "Tramisol Cattle and Sheep Wormer" or the 13 gram packet of "Tramisol Sheep Drench Powder" into the appropriate amount of water. If the stock solution is used with a water proportioner, be sure that the stock solution is dispensed at the rate of 1 oz/gallon in the drinking water.

    Any of the solutions are effective at treating Capillaria (capillary worms), Heterakis (cecal worms), and Ascaridia (roundworms). The solutions contain .5 gram of leviamisole per gallon of water. Allow the birds to drink the solution for one day, then remove. In severe cases, the treatment can be repeated every 5-7 days.
     
  10. tryxichicks

    tryxichicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 25, 2010
    This is straight from an avian specialist here in Oregon, I can provide you with the # just PM me. But here is what she told me for Ivermec. Its very very strong, but it will even rid them of gapeworms if they have them (panacur and/or Fenbendazole don't work for gapes, but are great for others). It is poison and you DO NOT want to redose. It can take a week for symptoms to subside with any worms.
    The Ivermectin 1.87% for horses is what they recommended. A tiny pea size amount. Per hen.
    Good luck!!!
     

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