Janoel7-56 incubator musings

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by banderbear, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. banderbear

    banderbear New Egg

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    Feb 15, 2016
    After having no luck with an expensive incubator I decided to buy a cheapie off the online local auction Website. I purchased a Janoel7-56 which is pretty basic. I did a hatch as soon as I got it at the start of winter which didn't go so well as I could not keep the humidity to a reasonable level not keep the temperature correct. I have since discovered that the thermometer I was using was reading wrong and that I should have trusted the incubator thermometer all along!

    So a few observations that may help other newbies like me.

    Humidity. By filling the water channels as the manual suggests the humidity is way to high. Even filling one channel raises the humidity it about 70%. To get it down I discovered the answer. Humidity is controlled by the surface area of the water. Reduce the surface area and hey presto, humidity down to a reasonable 45%. This is how I did it, by covering up some of the channel with tin foil. [​IMG]
    Once these were installed the incubator held the humidity with out issue. The second thing I did was install a hose into the water channel so the I could add water without having to open the incubator. I drilled a hole through the wall of the inubator and used food grade silicon hosing.
    [​IMG]
    I then use a syringe to push the water in.
    As the typical New Zealand house doesn't have central heating and the temperature inside goes from zero overnight to 25 during the day when the fire is going, insulating the incubator was needed to keep the poor thing from having to work too hard. I used the box it came in and cut it down a little so that I could access the control panel at the from and the manual turning gadget.
    [​IMG]
    The bottom half is also wrapped in a blanket. I use one of the air holes in top to place a calibrated thermometer through just to keep and eye on the temp.
    Once the chicks have hatched you do have to be around as if they sit against the internal thermometer the incubator starts to heat up. Next hatch I think I will isolate the incubators thermometer with a homemade mesh "fence" to keep the hatchlings away from it.
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Yes, the instructions that come with the bators for humidity can really screw a person over. I run dry for the first 17 days as long as my incubator hangs around 30%. If I need more moisture because it's too dry, or my eggs (like the small silkies I did) need higher than my norm, I just wet a spong and set it in at egg level. Makes it easy to replace humidity by just rewetting the sponge. I don't ever fool with the water wells until lockdown/hatch.

    As I am hands on, I don't worry about opening the bator, I open the bator frequently during hatch and I also remove my chicks as the become active and place them in the brooder. I do keep my brooder, or I should say; one end of my brooder, close to 100F because I do move them as they hatch. I fill all my wells and then add sponges atop my screen and that is how I keep my humidity up during hatch (especially important when you open the bator) by keeping the sponges wet.

    Good to see your problem solving techniques. I still use the old brooder light for my brooder, and a couple times I have turned it on during hatch and directed it toward the incubator at night when it was cooler and we werent using heat, to keep the temps up because I use an old LG w/o thermostat control.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY

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