Japanese quail questions

Discussion in 'Quail' started by ambient, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. ambient

    ambient New Egg

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    Jan 21, 2009
    I want to raise quail for eating and eggs. The japanese quail (cortunix japonica) is said to be hardy, a prolific breeder and it looks (to me) a good size for eating. HOWEVER I have read they won't incubate and hatch their own eggs. I want quail that will hatch their own eggs. Does anyone know:

    A: Is it possible to get japanese quail to hatch their own eggs?

    B: If not, what are some other breeds of a suitable size to eat, that hatch their own eggs and are fairly hardy?
     
  2. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:A. Yes its possible but i've never tried it you'd have to make thir home replicate what it would be in the wild (places to hide and such) and luck.

    B. Not sure, bobwhites may but i've never heard of someone getting theirs to brood either....but im sure they do! [​IMG]
     
  3. therealsilkiechick

    therealsilkiechick ShowGirl Queen

    Jul 18, 2007
    Northwestern, pa
    cortunix don't hatch their own eggs, been there done that. bobs might if they have a natural habitat but they r smaller birds. only one i think might set their own eggs would be possible cal valley or gambles. i don't know how the other breeds r but there is many varieties of quails.
     
  4. LilRalphieRoosmama

    LilRalphieRoosmama Officially Quacked

    Oct 15, 2007
    Elyria, OH
    Mine lay them on the run and keep going. I don't have nesting material in there, but even if I did I doubt they would sit on them. I have the jumbo coturnix and they are great birds for eggs and for eating. I would highly recommend them but an incubator is a necessity to keep them going.
     
  5. ambient

    ambient New Egg

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    Jan 21, 2009
    hmm...now I'm thinking I might have to get an incubator.

    I'm from Australia, so I'm not sure what quail varieties are available here. Thanks for the advice!
     
  6. ambient

    ambient New Egg

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    Jan 21, 2009
    What about the common quail, (coturnix, coturnix). Are they egg hatchers? And if so, do people breed them?
     
  7. Lophura

    Lophura Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 23, 2008
    Holden, Missouri
    Quote:While in your experience that didn't, I wouldn't rule it out. It is true that through domestication, most lose the instinct to do so, but if you can simulate a natural environment, it can happen. Given the favourable settings, any Quail species will rear chicks naturally.

    Quote:I wouldn't race out quite yet if you don't want to spend the money. Give them a shot and see what happens. The bloodlines in Australia are perhaps closer to origin stock than our mess here in the states, so there is potential for them.

    Dan
     
  8. Suz658

    Suz658 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 1, 2009
    Scotland. UK
    I've yet to have a coturnix set & incubate eggs but I do have 2 hens that will happily foster & brood chick both coturnix & bobwhite ....

    (Goldie with BW's)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (Goldie with her coturnix brood) - Click on picture to view slide show.

    [​IMG]

    You could try using a light weight broody bantam chicken to incubate your quail eggs, I've been experimenting with using miniature bantam Silkies with good results so far, but i suggest if using silkies that you trim their longer feather to prevent chicks getting tangled.

    Suz
     
  9. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:I always love seening these Suz [​IMG]
     
  10. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    I agree with the chicken hen incubating the eggs. I have some really tiny OEGB and dutch hens, and I think that's what they'll do, since I can't find bf's for them!
     

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