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Junior Needs help on hatching eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by chicken111324, Oct 13, 2015.

  1. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    I need some help with a bantam game hen that is sitting on 12 eggs. I also didnt candle them.
    On the 22nd of September (3 weeks ago) in the late afternoon i put 12 eggs under my game hen. She has been sitting on them ever since getting off for about 30mins every couple of mornings.
    This morning on the 21st day one egg burst under her, so i cleaned off the eggs and her bedding and left her alone. when i got back this afternoon none had hatched and there i don't think there is any pipping.

    Will they still hatch or are the eggs not fertile?
    I read somewhere that if you put them under in the late afternoon then the eggs are due the next day. Is this true? if so that means that the eggs would be due tomorrow?

    Your help would be much appreciated
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  2. Shaf9

    Shaf9 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2015
    21 days is just a baseline average. Some can take 23-25 days to hatch. I would say candle them and see if you can see any development.
     
  3. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    Is it still alright to candle them at this late stage (21 days)
     
  4. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    Good news i candled the eggs tonight and 2 are fertile. even though its only 2 i have another 12 due in 2 weeks.

    If the eggs are totally black except the air sack will they hatch tomorrow
     
  5. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Oct 11, 2014
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    You start your count 24 hours after set regardless of what time of day you set. (Yes, there are arguments about this.) A chicken egg takes 21 days of INCUBATION. They do not have 1 day of incubation until they've been incubated for 24 hours. Yes, 21 days is a guideline. Banties for example often put in an appearance a day or two early. If the temps haven't been ideal that will also effect the hatch time. If there's been lower than idealtemps or frequent periods of excess cooling it will delay the hatch. If temps are above the ideal you could see early hatchers. In general though the farther from the ideal 21 day incubation you get the higher probability of chicks hatching with developmental problems.

    General rule of thumb is whatever day of the week you set them on, you expect hatch on the same day three weeks later. So if you set on a Wednesday you would (in general) expect to see action by the Wednesday 3 weeks later.

    If at candle the egg is filled and there is detectable movement, there is still a good chance for progress. If there is no detectable movement or veining has dissapeared or absorbed chances are there are quitters. Many people leave the eggs in incubation for 2-3 days past the official hatch date, some will go longer. (Under a broody a lot depends on how long she is willing to sit.)
     
  6. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    Thankyou AmyLynn2374

    When i candled them the eggs were very dark and full and you could see veins near the airsack. Does this mean they are still alive. (this was on the 21st day)
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Generally veining is a sign of life, but it's harder to tell in late quitters. Personally as long as I could at least see veining I would hold out hope, at least for 2-3 days after expected hatch.
     
  8. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    Thankyou AmyLynn2374

    This morning (day 23) there was 2 pips on one of the eggs and it was cheeping. I know there should only be one pip but it was a bit like she tried to do one pip and then tried again.
    This afternoon (day 23) there was more of a crack/ pip but no zipping yet. So i decided to help it out. I ended up taking the whole top of the egg (air sack area) of to make the chick get out easily.

    The second egg has no pip so i am beginning to think it is a quitter.

    Will the first egg be okay to get out now by itself?
    After how many days should i throw the other egg out if it hasn't hatched?
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    It may or may not be able to finish itself. I'm thinking the positioning wasn't good inside the egg if it pipped in one spot and then made a second pip, so it's possible that it's not in a position that will allow it to finish. Then again there's always that chance that it will. If by now it hasn't I would preceed with an assisted hatch, going until I saw veining before stopping moistening the membrane and replacing the egg to the bator.

    If there is no movement or sign of life in the other, I would tap into the air cell and check for any life by touching the chick through the membrane of the air cell. If there's no life I would do an eggtopsy (if you do them). Usually past day 23/24 chances of getting a healthy chick is quite low.
     
  10. chicken111324

    chicken111324 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2015
    I had to help it out and now have 1 chick that is healthy and already out and about without mum because she is still sitting on another egg. The second egg this morning on day 25 had a pip in it a bit like the first chicks egg. I opened up the top from where the pip was so the whole top wheree the air sack is. There was slight bleeding from the veins but nothing else. So will the chick be okay?
     

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