Just hatched a chick that looks all bloated and swollen all over.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by LocoPollo, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. LocoPollo

    LocoPollo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ellijay, GA
    I just hatched a barnevelder chick that is all swollen and bloated. I have never seen this before. Will he be ok?
     
  2. turtleblossom

    turtleblossom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 8, 2008
    Kentucky
    Poor chickie. Nobody has any answers? I hope this bump helps.
     
  3. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 15, 2009
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    Omphalitis can do that. It's a naval infection. Is his belly button gross, swolen, and green? Clean out your incubator, hatcher, and brooder very well before you hatch any more chicks. I don't know if you can save this little one, but you can prevent further occurances. Is it just his abdomen that is swollen? In that case, it might just be the yolk if it wasn't properly absorbed.
     
  4. walkswithdog

    walkswithdog Overrun With Chickens

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    I've seen it twice, one got better after a couple of days of resting in the hatcher. One died. Never did find out what it was, haven't seen it again.
     
  5. LocoPollo

    LocoPollo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 13, 2008
    Ellijay, GA
    He is just resting at the moment. He doesn't look different in any other way. His belly is fine, just bloated and swollen all over.
     
  6. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Antibiotics might help. But I'm not sure what you'd want to use (depends on the bacteria). If I remember correctly, Omphalitus is caused by a (watch me butcher the spelling of this) streptococcis type bacteria.
     
  7. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Maybe this will help? From the Merck Veterinary Manual...

    Omphalitis is a condition characterized by infected yolk sacs, often accompanied by unhealed navels in young fowl. It is infectious but noncontagious and associated with excessive humidity and marked contamination of the hatching eggs or incubator.
    The affected chicks or poults usually appear normal until a few hours before death. Depression, drooping of the head, and huddling near the heat source usually are the only signs. The navel may be inflamed and fail to close, producing a wet spot on the abdomen; a scab may be present. Opportunistic bacteria (coliforms, staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp , and Proteus spp ) are often involved, and mixed infections are common. Proteolytic bacteria are prevalent in outbreaks. The yolk sac is not absorbed and often is highly congested or may contain solidified pieces of yolk material; peritonitis may be extensive. Edema of the sternal subcutis may be seen. Mortality often begins at hatching and continues to 10-14 days of age, with losses up to 15% in chickens and 50% in turkeys. Chilling or overheating during shipment may increase losses. Persistent, unabsorbed, infected yolks often produce chicks or poults with reduced weight gain.
    There is no specific treatment; antibiotic use is based on the prevalent bacterial type involved, but is probably of little value. The disease is prevented by careful control of temperature, humidity, and sanitation in the incubator. Only clean, uncracked eggs should be set. If it is necessary to set dirty eggs, they should be segregated from clean eggs. Sanitizing detergents must be used according to directions if eggs are washed. Time, temperature, and frequent changes of water are as critical as the concentration of sanitizer in both wash and rinse water. The rinse should be warmer than the wash water (which should be warmer than the internal temperature of the egg), but should not be >60°C.
    The incubator should be cleaned and disinfected thoroughly between hatches. If fumigation is to be done with formaldehyde, vents should be closed. Thirty mL of 40% formaldehyde per 0.6 m3, or paraformaldehyde (in the strength recommended by the manufacturer), should be allowed to evaporate in the closed incubator or hatcher. The machines are readily contaminated after fumigation unless the exterior of the machines and the rooms in which they are located are cleaned and disinfected.
     

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