Keep dying

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Theeremmy, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. Theeremmy

    Theeremmy Chirping

    57
    38
    61
    Jan 30, 2018
    I got 12 turkeys from Rural King and they just keep dying. I’m not sure why. The have clean bedding, a heat lamp, and plenty of food and water. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong with them. I’ve never had issues with any of my ducks or chickens..
     
  2. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

    8,450
    18,109
    941
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    You have not provided any information that can be used to determine what the problem may be.

    What is the temperature you are using in the brooder?
    What are you feeding the poults?
    Is there blood in their stools?
    Are they actually eating and drinking?

    Poults can be very vulnerable in their first couple of weeks.
     
  3. Theeremmy

    Theeremmy Chirping

    57
    38
    61
    Jan 30, 2018

    The temp stays at 95 and they’re being fed a mixture of chick starter and meat bird (suggested by the guy that works specifically with them in Rural King). No bloody stools at all and I have electrolytes in their water. They seem to be eating and drinking fine.

    I’ve been told that they have very low immune systems and could be dying because of being in the house. I also have a separate brooder with ducklings in it inthe house as well.
     
  4. DuckyDoodles

    DuckyDoodles No Idea What The Duck I’m Doing ;)

    281
    932
    167
    Feb 11, 2018
    Indiana
    Awww that’s terrible to hear! I agree with @R2elk ; we need a little more information on their symptoms (and care) before much help could be gained. For instance, I’ve not owned turkeys before but I know they need to be kept at a higher temperature than chicks and ducklings... so knowing their brooder temperature would certainly help.

    How quickly did they die after you got them? Were they all purchased at same time or in rounds? Symptoms prior to/time of death?

    These will help narrow down some of the helpful input because it could be anything from a disease to a food to a temperature at this point.
     
  5. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

    8,450
    18,109
    941
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    I start my turkey poults at 90°F measured at the bedding. Measuring the temperature in the air will cause it to be too hot.

    I feed my poults a 28% protein turkey/gamebird starter. Poults can survive on chick starter but it will set them back permanently and does not meet their nutrition needs. A proper turkey starter has higher levels of lysine, niacin and methionine than chick starter in addition to the higher protein.

    You can help their dietary needs by feeding them hard boiled eggs that have been shelled and then chopped into small pieces. It won't raise the protein.

    Unfortunately company employees that don't actually raise guineas or turkeys really give a lot of bad advice about proper feeding for keets and poults. It is usually company policy they give out and not what the proper feed and care really is.
     
    New2DuckyDoodles and Theeremmy like this.
  6. Theeremmy

    Theeremmy Chirping

    57
    38
    61
    Jan 30, 2018

    I’ve also noticed it’s hard to keep a constant temp in their brooder. If I keep the heat lamp on them then it’s too hot and if I shut it off for about 10-15mins it gets too cold..
     
    New2DuckyDoodles likes this.
  7. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

    8,450
    18,109
    941
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    You don't control the temperature by turning the light on and off. You control the temperature by using an appropriate sized bulb for the brooder and by controlling the distance the light is from the bedding. If the temperature is too hot, you need to raise the bulb farther away. If the temperature is too cold you need to move the bulb closer.

    If you are constantly chilling the poults, that could have a really bad effect on their survival. Keeping them overheated can also be harmful.

    An alternative method to heating a brooder is the Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder by @Blooie
     
    New2DuckyDoodles likes this.
  8. DuckyDoodles

    DuckyDoodles No Idea What The Duck I’m Doing ;)

    281
    932
    167
    Feb 11, 2018
    Indiana
    I’ve learned today (since picking the girls up around 8am) that the opening/closing of doors and/or drafts of cool air have had an effect on their brooder temperature. I’ve just been adjusting it by moving the lamp closer/further heighten it and it would even itself out. So that’s something I can attest to; the temps can fluctuate based on drafts or surrounding temps. Our weather dropped 20 degrees today compared to yesterday and so me letting the dogs in and out, or my in/our for other reasons have an affect on the brooder since it’s in the living room. It’d drop to about 87 or peak at about 93. So when I noticed this fluctuation, I promptly moved the bulb to accommodate. Doesn’t take much of a height adjustment to level it out.

    I’d suppose keep an eye on contributing temp factors like that too.
     
  9. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

    8,450
    18,109
    941
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    The Mama Heating Pad in the Brooder by @Blooie is much less susceptible to drafts.
     
    New2DuckyDoodles likes this.
  10. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida

    16,300
    26,376
    767
    Feb 25, 2014
    Northwestern Wyoming
    My Coop
    Thanks for the tag, Bob. @Theeremmy, Mama Heating Pad works by warming the Littles directly, not by warming the entire space, which is why it’s so effective. I’m going to get on my computer and see if I can still find the video that inspired me to try using a heating pad in the first place. Patrice Lopatin made it a few years ago, and I know she had turkeys in hers along with chicks. I know that video is posted a few pages into the Mama Heating Pad thread - just a matter of doing a little digging.

    I’ve never raised turkeys myself, but here in Northwestern Wyoming wild turkeys are raising their young in the snow, and just letting the babies duck under for a quick warmup. Like all poultry, overheating can cause a lot of problems, one of which is dehydration -despite drinking - as a result of being totally surrounded by the warm, dry air from the lamp. While I’m not saying that’s what yours are having issues with, it is a possibility.
     
    New2DuckyDoodles likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: