Keep the rooster or get rid of him???

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Fowlinthehollow, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. Fowlinthehollow

    Fowlinthehollow Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay folks, I need some advice. I have 8 chickens-5 pullets, 2 hens that aren't currently laying and a rooster. The pullets are new to my flock. I got them after I had a hen die on me. To get the 2 groups used to each other I had the pullets in my large coop/run and the others in a tractor which I kept near by. About a month ago I put the older chickens/rooster in the coop with the pullets at night and hoped for the best. The top hen is a little aggressive to the pullets but nothing I didn't expect and when they are free ranging all is well. The rooster however, is still really aggressive. It's almost like he's trying to flog the pullets. As I've been watching his behavior really close this past month I've noticed his behavior with the older hens is slightly aggressive too. Not to the same degree but he does harass them enough so that they try to hide in the nest boxes. So. Maybe that's why my hens aren't laying since the one hen died? She had been his favorite and maybe he just can't adjust?? My question is this-do I keep him and try to get the two groups together or just get rid of him? Other than this behavior he hasn't been a bad roo. He's good with me but he has been aggressive with others when they wander through the yard but I always figured it's cuz he didn't know them..
     
  2. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Really, I would get rid of him. You will notice almost immediately a relaxing of your flock. His behavior is bothering you and them. Some roosters are fantastic, others are miserable and they often turn into nightmares. He is just not working out, and really time is not going to help much.

    Contact local people with chickens if you want a rooster. I can nearly guarantee that someone has an extra rooster that is just so nice they hate to cull him and will be thrilled to put him in your flock.

    Or you might try going roosterless. Hens are often very happy without a rooster at all, much happier than with a rotten rooster.

    Mrs K
     
  3. Fowlinthehollow

    Fowlinthehollow Out Of The Brooder

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    That is more or less what I've been thinking too. I wanted a rooster for the added protection when they free range but I don't want my hens to be miserable..
     
  4. AmericanMom

    AmericanMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2..... When I introduce a new rooster to my flock of hens and roosters I expect alittle roughness from the roo, trying to establish himself etc, but for an established rooster to flog the girls, no way... There are to many good roosters out there that once they find their place in the coop are good boys both with the hens and with humans.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    X 3! Would you put up with your dog being aggressive towards people in your yard b/c he doesn't know them? Why should you accept less from your rooster? And, if he's aggressive towards the pullets and hens, after a month? Totally not ok. How big is your coop? If they are crowded, that might be part of the issue. But, IF they ARE crowded, that's just an other reason to get rid of him! There are plenty of nice roosters out there. He's crock pot material. I'd not let him play in the gene pool.
     
  6. Fowlinthehollow

    Fowlinthehollow Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 9, 2013
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    Okay thanks, guess I knew he would have to go..was hoping maybe there was a magic fix. I don't think my coop is too small, I have a 6x6 coop and a old dog kennel, think it's 6x12 for the pen and they get free range time close to every afternoon..

    I will get rid of him and try to go rooster-less for a while, at least until spring.
     
  7. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's two possibilities here (IMO)

    1. You've got a crappy rooster - get rid of him.

    2. You've got a crappy alpha hen, and shes not accepting the rooster, and he's having to continually prove that hes in charge.


    Personally, I'd crock pot the two of them and raise a new rooster in the spring.
     
  8. RoosterDon

    RoosterDon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't forget, as you are raising chicks you stand a good chance of getting another roo or more. Our oritinal roo was a doll then turned mean. We had two roos hatch and it turned out one was very sweet and the other was a real pain as well. I gave the first mean one away (I could not stomach killing and eating our original roo that we had named) then realized he probably ended up on someones table anyway.

    During this whole period the hens were out of sorts.So I killed the other mean rooster and there is peace in the coop once again.

    It is easier now to kill mean hens and roos in order to have peace, since peace means more eggs and fewer fights.
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Get rid of him. If you decide you want to keep a rooster, look for a young one in the spring when folks are trying to unload their Oops cockerels. Put a young guy in the flock with the older hens and let them bring him up to be a gentleman. By next fall you'd have a pretty good rooster, I'm guessing.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree with Donrae, roosters grow faster than their flock mates, often times makes them bigger and more of a bully. However, if they are growing up with adult birds around them, they get their fair share of mind your manner thumps, and it seems to keep the bullying down. They learn how to be a rooster, not nearly as often a jerk.

    Mrs K
     

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