Keeping Chickens in Urban Nova Scotia

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by La Banan, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. La Banan

    La Banan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 28, 2008
    Here are two letters from yesterday's Chronicle Herald - the main newspaper of Halifax, Nova Scotia:

    Voice of the people


    Tue. Feb 10 - 4:46 AM
    Issue no joke


    Your article "Who allows urban chickens?" (Feb. 5) plays up the idea that the urban chicken debate is a waste of time and resources, somehow on par with HRM council’s inane debates on cat bylaws. In fact, the decision whether to allow hens in Halifax for domestic egg production is an important topic relating to food security, food safety and urban sustainability, and it deserves the attention of council.

    My Grade 12 geography students understand the environmental and socioeconomic benefits of producing food close to home. Please don’t do your readers a disservice by treating the issue as a big joke.

    Ben Sichel, Dartmouth

    Dialogue needed


    I would like to invite the citizens of HRM to have some serious dialogue about the present chicken bylaws and make their feelings known to their councillors. A report that was to be presented to the Peninsula community council this week supports the present narrow-minded view of not allowing householders to keep a small flock for their own egg use in most of the urban areas of HRM.

    Please consider what this means. It is easier for the councillors to keep to the safe status quo and to believe the self-serving rhetoric of the industrial food producers. Most of us of middle-age and older can remember a time when it was absolutely ordinary for every family in the city and country to keep a small flock, to grow a small garden and even to keep a "family cow." These weren’t farmers or agriculturists; they were folks who knew how to survive hard economic times.

    I keep a small flock in Prospect Bay. Four hens provide all the eggs my family of four needs. Besides the eggs given, we have culled the cockerels and had several good stews and soups, and we will have a rich source of compost for our vegetable garden this summer. Oh, is it safe to grow our own vegetables? Heaven knows we may soon be advised it is not.


    Jan Morrison, Prospect Bay
     
  2. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan, the city council is non-responsive. Did you see the lady who had had the 3 chickens who were thrown out of the city- Louise Canavan, on CTV?

    Apparently there is still a loophole in the law about the definition of chickens as livestock. In fact, the term 'chicken' is missing, so I think a smart lawyer who wanted to keep chickens could pull it off. Any takers? The greatest misery is that parts of the former Halifax County that were amalgamated with the city lost some rights. Another possible legal challenge? There is still a road in Lower Sackville where it's legal to keep a horse, so the law is anything but definitive. I can't imagine the neignbours in that suburban neighbourhood tolerating it, the street (Old Sackville Road) has special status linked to the former horse track, and many horse owners had chickens, too.

    Present chicken owners have been silent in HRM, afraid of losing their flocks, I think. But for those around the city, like ourselves, it's always worth talking to anyone who will listen, and I do! [​IMG]
     

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