Keeping out the wind

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by MrsRodgers, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. MrsRodgers

    MrsRodgers Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2012
    I live at 9000 ft in the mountains, and the wind here in the winter is atrocious. I bought a couple of tarps, and plan on making a snug fitting cover for the coop to alleviate the winds freezing out my sweetie pies. Does anyone have any thoughts on why I shouldn't do it this way?
     
  2. MrsRodgers

    MrsRodgers Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2012
    [​IMG]
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    If it were my coop I'd use some of those clear, corragated panels that you could then remove in the summer. I think you'd get better results and it would last a lot longer, you won't have the problem of the wind ripping and blowing away the tarps. Plus it will let sunlight in so it will be nice and light in there for them.

    I have an open air coop inside my goat barn and that's what I used to close in the end where they sleep precisely to keep the wind off of them in the winter.
     
  4. MrsRodgers

    MrsRodgers Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2012
    That's a good idea, but I think I will use a heavy duty plastic for the sides on the bottom. I can then roll it up and tie it at the top, sort of like a tent window. That would let the sunlight in. Yes, it will eventually crack, but I'll make another. Plastic is cheap. And as for the tarp getting ripped by the wind, it will be tight enough not to be able to flap. I am a master seamstress, and have no doubts as to the fit. Thanks for the input about the sun, though! I guess I was thinking if it was that windy, they would be up in the coop, anyway. Covering the bottom will also keep the snow from blowing in under the coop, so if they would like to come down and be in the bottom, they could. At least while I am shoveling a path for them in the winter...
     
  5. MrsRodgers

    MrsRodgers Out Of The Brooder

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    Something to add...we routinely get over 100 mph winds here most of the winter..and our winter is very long. The coop is quite sheltered, actually. That picture was taken in the spring. We have now piled almost 8 cords of wood in a u shape all around the outside of the fence, so that will help break the wind a lot. As the winter progresses, we'll burn it, so the barrier will disappear. If I just put plastic panels on the bottom, to cover the wire, there will still be lots of cracks where the wind and snow will get in. I just want to make sure the heat stays in, and the drafts stay out.
     
  6. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2010
    Westfield, Indiana
    Wow! 100+mph winds! [​IMG] That is incredible. I would make your upwind side of the coop pretty much sealed tight. Your coop could serve as a windbreak for the run if you have the coop located upwind of the run. All your vents and openings should be on the downwind side. Any upwind vents should have flaps that can be closed or adjusted for ventilation. I try to place my coop windows facing south for warming in the winter. Our big winds come from the west 99% of the time so the coop and run is designed to reflect that. I use 4x4's for the coop and run framework and exterior bead board walls and roof. Everything is screwed down or attached with metal angles. Good Luck!
     
  7. MrsRodgers

    MrsRodgers Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2012
    Ha! Not sure I'd call it incredible..more like irritating and tiring! Wind is awful..I live in a log home, and when it's really windy..the water sloshes in the toilet upstairs. And during the night, upstairs in bed..you can feel the house move. It's wild! In fact, our neighbor has his house for sale now. The reason when I asked why? 'We are tired of the wind." Me too...but I don't want to move.

    I have ordered some of those snaps that can screw into wood, and I will attach those to the cover and be able to 'batten down the hatches', so to speak.
     

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