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Keeping rooster in seperate pen

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by PhoenixPharm, Aug 14, 2014.

  1. PhoenixPharm

    PhoenixPharm Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi, I am rescuing an 11 week old rooster that was going to be sent to auction and I was wondering if I put him in a separate pen next to my girls will he be content? They would be able to see each other but not mate. My other option is to put him in with my goats.He is extremely friendly and used to being held. I do not want fertilized eggs. Opinions?
     
  2. windnleavesfarm

    windnleavesfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    See how he reacts to being in the pen next to the girls he might be fine with it. If he is pacing back and forth across the pen trying to get with the girls they you may want to try putting him with the goats. Very chicken it different.
     
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If you plan on keeping him, it might be an idea to quarantine him for a month before you put him anywhere near your hens. That means keeping him over 100' from your current coop, changing your shoes in between coops (and maybe your clothes, I'm not sure - I honestly have never felt the need to do so), using separate feeders and waterers. May I ask why you don't want fertilized eggs?
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    My feelings are he won't do well. Birds are social animals and interacting through a fence just isn't the same. Put him in with your hens, if you collect eggs every day you'll never, ever be able to tell the difference. Or, get another cockerel to keep him company and fence them separate from your hens, so they don't share a fence.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. PhoenixPharm

    PhoenixPharm Out Of The Brooder

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    He has a shared fence with the girls and also a coop (separated with chicken wire) I've kept him with the goats and he seems to be doing great. He doesn't seem stressed and still protects the girls on the other side of the fence.
    Thanks for the tips
     
  6. PhoenixPharm

    PhoenixPharm Out Of The Brooder

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    The thought of eating "baby chickens" from fert. eggs just does not appeal to me :)
     
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Honestly, you are not eating baby chicks from fertilized eggs. Development does not occur until incubation happens. That means the hen setting on them or being in an incubator under specific conditions and for at least 24 hours. I'm not trying to change your mind, just letting you know that you're really not eating baby chicks. It's not like humans where development begins at conception. If it were, we wouldn't need broody hens or incubators. [​IMG]
     
    OnnieMae, sourland and Mrs. K like this.
  8. PhoenixPharm

    PhoenixPharm Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, that makes sense :) I do have a silkie in with them and I'm still not sure if it's a male or female. Wanting to try and add more hens this spring but I heard it's a nightmare trying to add chickens to an existing flock (even though we only have 3 atm)
     
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Fertilized chicken eggs are in a state of suspension. Bobbi J is right, they do not begin to develop. The reason is it takes about 25 hours for a hen to lay an egg. Sometimes even today in people's flock, the natural process takes place. A hen will hide an egg, the next day she slips back there to her hidden nest, lay another egg. Pretty soon she will have a clutch of eggs, when the clutch looks to be the right number, she will begin to set.

    At this point she is a broody hen, with incredible high hormones. Her whole personality changes and even her posture. She sets on those eggs, low and flat, and will puff and growl if anything gets too close. She will only get off the nest once a day to eat and poop. After 24 hours of being warmed to close to 100 F, the eggs begin to develop and grow. All the eggs are in the same state of development, regardless that some were laid a few days ago, and some might be close to a week old. What nature has allowed, is for all the eggs to start at the same time, so that they hatch at the same time.

    When they hatch, she will leave the nest in about 12 hours, taking the live chicks with her, leaving any duds, create a new nest usually back with the flock. So you see, she needs those eggs to develop all at the same rate. She cannot be tied to a nest, trying to get the last laid eggs to hatch, while the live chicks are running around needing protection.

    This is also why, if you get a broody hen, you need to add the clutch all at the same time.

    I am of the opinion that chickens are flock animals, and need to be together. I am confused by the statement that he can protect them through the fence? He cannot rule his girls unless he is in there with them.

    Mrs K
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2015
    OnnieMae and bobbi-j like this.
  10. PhoenixPharm

    PhoenixPharm Out Of The Brooder

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    There was a hawk in my yard last week and he got on top of the goat hutch and warned them. They all ran into the coop and were safe. That's what I meant about protecting them. He's actually very happy living with the goats.
     

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