Kidding question

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by matsmom, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. matsmom

    matsmom New Egg

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    Aug 18, 2011
    I have a pygmy goat that is 8 months old and about to deliver her first kid. I was shocked to discover that she was pregnant so young. Not my idea, but sometimes these things find a way to happen. So now she is due and her ligaments are starting to soften so I know we are getting close. My biggest issue is her size versus the size of my billy. She doesn't look too bad now that the baby has dropped but I am still concerned she is going to have trouble getting the baby through her hips. I have started calling vets in my area to see about a c-section and have not found any that will take goats. Anyone know if it is possible to do a section without a vet present. I delivered my yr old nannies baby a few months ago without any issues but i don't think I can get my arm far enough in this little girl to help her. Any suggestions or tips from someone who has been there before?
     
  2. willkatdawson

    willkatdawson Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 31, 2008
    Ga
    Most large animal vets will treat all barnyard animals, and they will come to your house to do it. Plus....bonus, they are a fraction of the price of a small animal vet. My large animal vet came by recently to give the horses their shots, he gave my 3 huge dogs their 3 year rabies shot that the small animal vet said they couldn't give them, and he put one of our sweet hens down because of being egg bound. He was about 30 minutes late, and when he pulled up to the barn he said he was sorry for being late, but he had been looking through books and the internet as to the best way to put a chicken to sleep. He's great! Good luck.
     
  3. 1MrsMagoo

    1MrsMagoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2010
    St Tammany Parish LA
    I don't even think it is legal to attempt to do a c-section yourself...could be wrong, but just kind of strikes a bell with me. I think I remember reading about somebody who tried a c-section on their dog and had to take it to the vet for an infection: Ended up with cruelty to animal charges and surrendering their animal. Here is a link to an article with photos of a c-section performed on a young goat....
    http://www.bigredcouch.com/journal/archives/2009/04/goat_kidding.html

    Okay, I have a goat whose mother was a Nigerian dwarf that weighed about 60lbs. Somehow the guy where I bought her had his 160lb Nubian buck get to her and she had a kid that weighed 4.5 lbs with zero issues. I got an accidental mini-nubian out of the deal. He has grown up to be about 120lb goat, so he is mid-way between his parents size-wise. I don't know how big a size difference you are talking about, but the kid will be larger than a pygmy, but smaller than a normal kid for the breed of your buck. The big question is what is the size difference between the two in inches of height and weight? Too large and anything other than twins may kill her, the kid, or both and even then may be problematic.

    As to the vet issue....finding a vet who will treat goats can be a nightmare depending on where you live. Some areas large animal vets are easier to find than in other ones: I used to live in Ohio, not far from Amish country and had my pick of half a dozen guys. Here in SE Louisiana, I called dozens of vets and nobody would look at them. Finally, one of the vets referred me to someone (equine vet), who referred me to someone else who does care for them. This guy is super, but over an hour away.

    Just a suggestion, but if your state college has a veterinary school, they may be able to help you out. Also, my vet does a lot for the local 4-H kids that show large animals, so the local extension office that runs the 4-H program may be able to help you find somebody. I really hope you can find a vet just in case. Since she has softened, you don't have a whole lot of time.

    Please let me know how she makes out.
     
  4. matsmom

    matsmom New Egg

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    Aug 18, 2011
    Thanks everyone. I have a friend that is a large animal vet and he has been out a few times when I have needed him. He said he doesn"t remember enough about goats to be of much help to me when deliver time comes. I supposed, worst case, I could call and beg him to help me and hopefully we could muddle through it. Goats are not a big animal in my area so since there are not many people with them there is not much need for a vet that will take care of them. I was really hoping that I would end up with twins out of this deal since that would make it easier for her. I can see one leg along her side so I am pretty sure we only have one kid in there. My vet friend offered to use his doppler to look and see how many are in there but I told him not to worry about it. At this point it won't matter. I asked my friend if he knew of anyone I could call and have even talked with people at farm supply stores and have not come up with anyone that feels comfortable with goats. I will let you know how this turns out.
     
  5. 1MrsMagoo

    1MrsMagoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2010
    St Tammany Parish LA
    Quote:[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Geesh, poor goats...nobody likes them: Too little to be a large animal and too big to be a small one [​IMG]
     
  6. shadowpaints

    shadowpaints Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 20, 2009
    Rigby, Idaho
    a good vet that will treat goats is hard to find! i love my vet, and while i can usually fix most problems myself, he is there when needed!
    best i can suggest, is read up on goat anatomy just in case! read all u can, have a good kidding kid put together. good luck!
     
  7. 1MrsMagoo

    1MrsMagoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2010
    St Tammany Parish LA
    Quote:Yep, a good vet kit will save the day in a pinch! I have two huge toolboxes full of things I have acquired for emergency treatment of all our animals. I also have taken over the door of our spare refrigerator in the laundry room for Lactated Ringers Solution, Selmut, Nutridrench, vaccines after they arrive, etc. Doing your own vaccines and treatments for non-threatening illnesses will save a ton of money. I also bought veterinary manuals on each type of animal we keep. However, for anything serious a good vet on speed dial is the best answer.

    I am lucky that I have found three great vets: One for our horse, one for the goats and cow, and the large animal vet's partner does our dogs and cat. A good vet doesn't only come when you call, but will talk you through things like a complicated kidding as well. I have learned a lot from our veterinarians and wouldn't trade any of them.

    Our horse vet saved our filly's life last summer when she contracted a nasty case of strangles from the horses in the field next door (she went to the fence to visit, which is now blocked off, and their was a new mare over there that was sick). Almost overnight our horse developed a really high fever and her wind pipe was nearly cut off from the swelling. The vet had to come do an emergency tracheotomy, without which we were told she would have died. Our goat vet saved two of our goats lives when they were kids as well and is currently on standby since our cow is due to calf any time now. If anything looks weird I'll call and if it doesn't sound normal to him he'll be here in no time flat.

    Cuts, scrapes, minor fever and I'm good and equipped to handle. Anything requiring more than that and I'll call the folks who went to school for it.

    Hopefully all turns out well for the OP and her little goatie mamma.
     

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