Knowing for sure (well, maybe just a little better)

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by notsooldmcdonald, Nov 9, 2008.

  1. notsooldmcdonald

    notsooldmcdonald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi All-

    I posted this in egglaying/behaviors, but I thought it might be more appropriate here.

    So, now that I've been getting eggs for a few weeks now and tend to talk about eggs (and how good _I_ believe mine are) a lot, I find myself with some questions.

    First, I have read that feeding certain foods to my chickens will improve the quality of their eggs, but can I truly say that because I feed them kale, broccoli, flax, etc that the eggs they lay as a result of having eaten those things are better for me (or those people who eat them)? I'm perfectly happy feeding those treats regardless of their "egg impact" as the flock likes them and they have all been very healthy thus far. However, my gut feeling is that I can not claim that the eggs are better for me, because I have no proof beyond a collection of anectdotal stories. This said, I would really like to be able to state, as a matter of pride, that they contain x, y, and z.

    Second, is it even remotely economically feasible to get an analysis? Would it even make sense to do so in general? Clearly this is not a major issue, just a thought.

    Thanks!

    Have a great evening!
    -Christian
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Mother Earth News did an article on the better nutritional qualities of free-range eggs. They really are better for you. Google on that and you'll find the article, I think. Feeding them dark green veggies will certainly improve the yolk color and I would imagine, the nutritional values of the eggs.
     
  3. notsooldmcdonald

    notsooldmcdonald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Speckledhen! I'll check it out.

    -C
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    The data from the study in the Mother Earth News article only tells you (literally) what the properties were of the particular eggs tested from the particular flocks submitting eggs. You can't know for sure about the actual nutritional qualities of your own eggs (er, your hens' [​IMG]) without having them analyzed by a laboratory. And of course unless their diet is totally constant, the nutritional content will change from week to week (etc) anyhow.

    However, sensible extrapolation would suggest that the *sorts* of patterns described in the Mother Earth News article are quite likely to be occurring in your chickens too, if comparably kept/fed.

    So, can you KNOW without lab analysis? No. But is there reasonably solid, quantitative grounds for guessing what your eggs' nutritional analyses might come out like? IMO, yes there is.

    Plus of course, mmmm tasty [​IMG]


    Pat
     
  5. notsooldmcdonald

    notsooldmcdonald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Absolutely true.

    I struggled with the variability of my own pullets vs. the ones tested.

    When I think further, however, I also have to keep in mind that one of the best aspects of locally produced animal products is that they _do_ change (for the better I hope), and they _do_ vary. That's what makes some heritage breeds so special, right?

    Terroir, right? Could it apply to eggs?
    -Christian
     
  6. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    Free range hen eggs good.


    Store bought battery hen eggs not so good.



    Nuff said.


    (Works for me anyway)
     

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