Knowledge needed!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by MrsKluck, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. MrsKluck

    MrsKluck Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG] Hi ya'all! I'm getting started on building a coop for the six chicks I just hatched. Below is a link of what I am doing. The question I have is for the size. The interior coop will be 5 x 10 inches.Realizing that as of right now, I don't know the sex of these chicks, I eventually would like to keep six or eight hens, and maybe a rooster. (not sure about him as of yet). Would this be an adequate size for them based on the coop design in the link? Any input would be appreciated! Thanks!

    http://https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/garage-city-coop
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm assuming you mean 5 x 10 feet (not 5 x 10 inches)? A 50 square foot coop would likely have plenty of space for eight hens and a rooster. Going by the 4 square feet per bird rule, you could fit as many as 12 in it. Of course, many factors go into how many birds can fit in a certain area and the 4 square feet guideline isn't true 100% of the time. It should work fine for the number of birds you'll be putting in, though.
     
  3. MrsKluck

    MrsKluck Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks Wyandottes7! Good news. Its a go then. I appreciate you taking the time to answer....and may call on you throughout the building project, which is happening over the next two weeks.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Couldn't get link to work but found it, I think https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/garage-city-coop

    I would be concerned about good ventilation with this design.....
    .......and not sure how the birds get up and down from the roosts in that tight of a space.

    I was curious so found the thread about their coop and asked how it has worked out...maybe they'll reply.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
  5. ChicksAre4Kids

    ChicksAre4Kids Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think for free-ranging chickens, as many girls as can roost comfortably is a good #, since they spend most of their time outdoors. I had around 20 avg. in my old 8'x10', and now have 15 in my 6'x12'.


    Just my 1/5 of a dime....

    CK
     
  6. MrsKluck

    MrsKluck Out Of The Brooder

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    For ventilation, I don't think I'm going to give it its own ceiling. So maybe a few inch gap from top the wall to the roof would work for that??? I'm not that concerned about "chicken dust" I have a big shop vac! I realize now, I better get to researching other designs.....like for the roosts! I'm going to upload a picture of my space later for you to eyeball and comment on. I was thinking of including an existing window in the coop, but that would make the coop HUGE. So maybe I'll just add a window later. Right now, time is of the essence. The chicks are living in my office and winter is approaching. There aren't even a week old yet. Just FYI, the entire garage is insulated, so I figure a couple of good heat lamps in the coldest months in that enclosed space....even in Dec/Jan. in Chicago area should keep them warm. I know it's the wrong time of year to have Chicks around these parts...but it just happened....and there here.....and I love them already.....so I'll do the best I can with my limited resources to help them make it till spring.
     
  7. MrsKluck

    MrsKluck Out Of The Brooder

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    That is great to know! Thanks for commenting. I feel better now knowing the size works for you and yours![​IMG]
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Coop doesn't need heat, needs great venitlation...
    ...start ramping down their heat now..might be a good idea to put the brooder in the garage now so they acclimate to the outside temps.

    Here's my notes on chick heat, hope something in there might help:
    They need to be pretty warm(~85-90F on the brooder floor right under the lamp and 10-20 degrees cooler at the other end of brooder) for the first day or two, especially if they have been shipped, until they get to eating, drinking and moving around well. But after that it's best to keep them as cool as possible for optimal feather growth and quicker integration to outside temps. A lot of chick illnesses are attributed to too warm of a brooder. I do think it's a good idea to use a thermometer on the floor of the brooder to check the temps, especially when new at brooding, later i still use it but more out of curiosity than need.

    The best indicator of heat levels is to watch their behavior:
    If they are huddled/piled up right under the lamp and cheeping very loudly, they are too cold.
    If they are spread out on the absolute edges of the brooder as far from the lamp as possible, panting and/or cheeping very loudly, they are too hot.
    If they sleep around the edge of the lamp calmly just next to each other and spend time running all around the brooder they are juuuust right!

    The lamp is best at one end of the brooder with food/water at the other cooler end of the brooder, so they can get away from the heat or be under it as needed. Wattage of 'heat' bulb depends on size of brooder and ambient temperature of room brooder is in. Regular incandescent bulbs can be used, you might not need a 'heat bulb'. You can get red colored incandescent bulbs at a reptile supply source. A dimmer extension cord is an excellent way to adjust the output of the bulb to change the heat without changing the height of the lamp.


    Or you could go with a heat plate, commercially made or DIY: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/pseudo-brooder-heater-plate
     
  9. ChicksAre4Kids

    ChicksAre4Kids Chillin' With My Peeps

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    aart: I see why the original link didn't work. It's the double http://. Thanks for posting the fixed one, most people wouldn't notice the double.
    I agree with the ventilation problem you're seeing too, I'm thinking mechanical may be needed to keep respiratory problems at bay.
    Ammonia buildup and all. Vent high and do not use windows for vents and you should be okay.
    CFM shouldn't need to be TOO high for a sealed coop such as yours.
    I'd add a 12" 2x4 stud or two horizontal halfway up the wall to help them get to the higher roosts though, and turn their roosting 2x4s flat (wide) side up.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015

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