Korean Black Chicken (Ogol Chicken), Korean Breeds of Chickens: Their Discussion and Photos

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by HallFamilyFarm, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    Monticello, Arkansas
    Are there any of these in the USA? We have a family near us that is hosting a Korean student this year. She has joined our 4-H club. Would be nice to locate some of her native chickens for her to have here.

    Guess this post can start a conversation on this unusual Korean breed of chicken. The below article is all I could find about it on the internet. Perhaps there are other Korean breeds in the USA. If so, please post photos and discussion about them.

    Someone posted on the responses of the below article that some were listed on a MN Craigs List ad. But they can no longer find it.




    Subject
    Korean Black Chicken (Ogol Chicken)


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    Description
    Korean Black Chicken (Ogol Chicken)
    Sancheong, Kyeongsangnamdo, South Korea
    Ogol means "black bone" in Korean. This breed's feather, meat, and bones are black in color.

    Korean Native Ogol Chicken, Korean Black Chicken, Ogol Fowl
    "Several poultry farms in Korea are raising Korean Native Chickens, or the Ogol Fowl. The Korean Native Chicken is believed to have been raised for almost 2,000 years. It is not easy to find pure lines, because most disappeared during World War II and the Korean War. The remainder were crossed with imported breeds. Recently, many researchers have tried to find the specific characters of this breed. The Ogol chicken is bred, not for quantity, but for quality. The native chicken grows very slowly and its egg production is poor. The price of its meat is almost five times higher than that of ordinary broilers. The Korean native chicken was not bred for meat purposes, but is adapted to backyard raising. The boom to raise this breed started after consumers began to look for good quality chicken meat.

    The average body weight of the Korean Native Chicken at 14 weeks of age is 867.7g. The eviscerated carcass yield at 9-14 weeks is 74.1-78.5% for males and 73.9-77.5% for females.

    In terms of body chemical composition at 14 weeks, the crude protein of Korean nativechickens was 25.03-26.36% in the breast and 21.65-21.85% in the thigh, which is a little higher than the crude protein content of broilers.

    The Korea Ogol fowl typically has black feathers, beak, comb, legs, bone, skin, and meat. The meat is often eaten as a folk remedy, to improve people's health. Although the meat of this breed fetches a very good price, it is not yet very popular. However, raising these two native breeds might be suitable for farmers who have only a small land area and limited resources." - Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1992


     
  2. crazypetlady

    crazypetlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Pocono farms on rare breed auction has a black boned Orpen is that maybe similar? Or she might know. I know it's used or medicinal purposes.
     
  3. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    Jan 25, 2010
    Monticello, Arkansas
    The so called Orpen is a new cross that they have developed. I looked it over while they listed eggs on eBay. They have no science backing up their claims. Its like snake oil.

    In any case, we are looking for a true Korean breed. Thanks though!
     
  4. din0nut

    din0nut Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 7, 2012
    Did you ever find a source for this breed of chicken? we have a large Korean community and They would greatly appreciate it if I can find this breed for them.
     
  5. Old Rando

    Old Rando Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern Indiana
  6. ayak12

    ayak12 New Egg

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    Apr 23, 2013
    Thanks so much for writing a article on the Ogol chicken. I used your website for a school project. thanks again!
     
  7. ayak12

    ayak12 New Egg

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    Apr 23, 2013
    Until I did a school project I did not know about this chicken-- and I live in Korea! :)
     

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