Lamps - Red vs. White bulbs?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by AllChookUp, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. AllChookUp

    AllChookUp Will Shut Up for Chocolate

    May 7, 2008
    Frozen Lake, MN
    I've seem some pics on here where some people are using red and white bulbs (two lamps, one with each type of bulb).

    What is the purpose? Is the white bulb for heat AND light, and the red bulb just for heat (at night)? Is that setup recommended?
     
  2. Red

    Red Chillin' With My Peeps

    351
    0
    149
    Mar 17, 2007
    I've only ever hatched chicks with an incubator once, and we used a white heat lamp. The problem we had with this that when we turned the light off for the first time when the chicks were about 7.wo, they were terrified of the dark and peeped loudly until the light was turned on and someone went to sit with them. We had to 'teach' them that the dark was when they were supposed to sleep, as before they had slept whenever they felt like it because there was constant light [​IMG]

    I'm not sure if there is this trouble with the red heatlamps or not?
     
  3. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    I try to use red bulbs, when I can. I think it reduces picking & stress....
     
  4. AllChookUp

    AllChookUp Will Shut Up for Chocolate

    May 7, 2008
    Frozen Lake, MN
    Heather; I checked out your website - That is some awesome artwork. I'm going to look into it more.

    Thanks for the feedback on the red bulb, too.
     
  5. sara

    sara Title Needed Here

    I only recently used a red 250 watt bulb because i was out of room in the basement, and had to put chicks in the barn and needed the extra heat. Normally I just use a 75 or 100 watt white lightbulb in the basement. It gives more than enough heat. [​IMG]
     
  6. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Thank you!!
     
  7. Grindlefamily

    Grindlefamily Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    0
    139
    Mar 30, 2008
    Fairfield, ME
    I used a natural plant bulb, and my chicks seemed to like that over the bright white of a regular bulb. I have been using a red light at night since it is warm enough now that they don't need heat.

    Good Luck.

    Louella
     
  8. AllChookUp

    AllChookUp Will Shut Up for Chocolate

    May 7, 2008
    Frozen Lake, MN
    Grindlefamily wrote:
    I have been using a red light at night since it is warm enough now that they don't need heat.

    I must be missing something - Doesn't the red bulb give out heat? I thought that was the point - It gives heat, but very little light.​
     
  9. Grindlefamily

    Grindlefamily Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    0
    139
    Mar 30, 2008
    Fairfield, ME
    Mine are still young enough that they want light, but it is warm enough to not need one.

    I only found a 25 watt bulb, and couldn't keep my babies warm enough with that so that is why I used the plant bulb with natural light.

    Louella
     
  10. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

    5,535
    69
    308
    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    Heres what I have learned.

    Chicks arent the brightest bulbs in the brooder. They are easily confused, not knowing where the food or water is, and so they are sometimes left out. This is especially so in larger brood arrangments. It so happens that they are also attracted to white light.

    They are also drawn to the color red, as in blood. The little savages start picking on each other, mercilessly, at an early age. This is especially prevalent when the brooder is a bit confined.
    I use the word 'savages' without equivocation. If a little blood is drawn under harsh white light, during these 'poking matches', then things can become dire. I've been suprised to see a blooded chick ravaged by its own flock mates within hours. I was shocked even more when they began to eat it, it's legs weakly flailing, trying to escape...

    SO I play to their "vices," as it were.
    I use red heat lights as their first light. Under red light, any blood is not seen as red, but merely as a speck of black. No red, no attack. It is also soothing, just what the doctor ordered for the first 3-4 days.

    I put a small white lamp directly above the food and water. A C7, 7W bulb is fine. This attracts them to the feeding station, so they can get to the food and water.

    Once they get well established, after the 1st week or so, I turn up the room lights and dispense with all the lighting trickery. The red lamp remains, but it is only there to add heat. By the 4th week they are out of the confines of the heated brooder.

    PS Forest Lake, MN - Ice Fishing Capital of the World.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2008

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by