Large gash on baby turkens neck - pine tar or neosporin?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by gritsar, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    My favorite baby turken (9 weeks old) has a large gash on the back of her neck. Not sure how she got it, but judging by the V shape, I'm thinking maybe one of the baby roos is practicing his mating skills (and failing miserably).
    Tonight we cleaned her wound first by flushing it with plain warm water and then applied first neosporin and then pine tar over that. This didn't seem to work so well, as a few minutes later the pine tar was gone. The "slippery" neosporin had caused the pine tar to slide right off.
    For future cleanings I think I'd be better off using one or the other, not both. I just can't decide which. Neosporin would work fine, but it wouldn't provide any protection from possible pecking from her flockmates. Pine tar would work as it's both an antiseptic and has germicidal properties, plus I know for a fact that it is a great anti-peck ointment. It probably doesn't work as well as the neosporin does for germ killing though.
    Which should I use or is there something better than either of these?
     
  2. VioletandBodie

    VioletandBodie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i would use neosporin but i don't know what pine tar is. If you can find some on line i would get AVI bird soother ointment it works really well on my exotics and the vet said it could be used with out worry of them ingesting it and getting sick. I'm sorry your little turken got hurt
     
  3. chicksbestfriend

    chicksbestfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dont know what pine tar is and neosporin is too messy to use. I swear by Scarlex, its a wonderful wound antiseptic and protectant, you should be able to pick it up at any feed store. Just spray a little bit on the wound and by the end of the day, you will definitely see it healing. Within a couple of days, wound should be completely healed over.
     
  4. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wouldn't use the pine tar on a gash like this...it irritates the skin & may damage new tissue. I use neosporin or BluKote...the purple stuff...whatever it's called in your neck of the woods. If the other chickens are pecking at it...you will need to seperate until healed.
     
  5. 8hipchicks

    8hipchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have the same issue with a chicken (gash on neck - really more the back of the crown leading down to the ear). I have read about various treatments from pine tar (have no idea what this is or where you get it, neosporin, and even supergluing the skin together.

    If you don't reattach the skin how does it grow back together. On my chicken every time she moves her head to groom the gash just gapes open.

    What do you do when the gash is in such a funky spot?

    Would appreciate any help with this.
     
  6. RedRoosterFarm

    RedRoosterFarm **LOVE MY SERAMAS**

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    I use bag-balm
    Good luck!
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Thanks for the suggestions y'all.
    For those of you that are interested, here's some information on pine tar (from wikipedia):

    Pine tar is widely used as a veterinary care product. It is a traditional antiseptic and hoof care product for horses and cattle. Pine tar has been used when chickens start pecking the low hen. Applying a smear of pine tar on the wound gives the attacking hens something else to do. They are distracted by the effort of trying to get the sticky pine tar off their beaks.

    Pine tar has also been used to make medicinal soap for people with skin ailments.

    I have found pine tar to be the most effective anti-peck product on the market (and I have tried them all). It tastes horrible (judging my chickens reactions to tasting it) and once they taste it they spend all their time trying to get it off their beaks and forget all about the flockmate they were pecking.

    My turkens wound seems to be scabbing over today.
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:I would try some pine tar. You can get it in the equine section of most farm stores. Chickens, like most livestock, have extraordinary healing capabilities. Nature makes it that way. Good luck!
     
  9. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    We just put the pine tar and neosporin into a medicine cup, nuke in the microwave for 3 sec. (soften up), use a couple of plastic coffee stirrers to mix it up and slather it on. Works very nicely on the roo's comb in the dead of winter when the girls do draw blood on occasion, cut way back on the jake's sparring injuries. Does stick to everything, takes some time to `weather' off of feathers, can't be used directly above the eyes during hot weather (possibility of running into eyes).

    Have never used on a larger open wound, so can't offer any advice on how well that would work.
     
  10. 8hipchicks

    8hipchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I would try some pine tar. You can get it in the equine section of most farm stores. Chickens, like most livestock, have extraordinary healing capabilities. Nature makes it that way. Good luck!

    Thanks! I went and got Pine Tar and am using it. Seems to work like a charm.
     

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