Large, swollen crops. How can I fix?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Anna_MN, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. Anna_MN

    Anna_MN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2011
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    My 14 Jumbo Cornish X Rocks are 16 days old. I went into the brooder room today and noticed their crops are EXTREMELY large. They get feed 12 hours on, 12 hours off. The feed is 20% protein and said you could feed it from day 1 of the chick's life. I was suspicious when I opened the bag and noticed cracked corn and alfalfa pellets in there. I spoke to my feed man and he said they will be fine and won't need grit until they are about 10 days old. So I ordered baby grit from him and when I went to pick it up a week later, he "forgot" to order it. I asked him what I could do in the mean time and he said I could give them sand and they will be fine. Nope- not the case. Their crops are HUGE and I don't know what to do about it. My baby grit is supposed to be in tomorrow. I put #2 grit in there with them but they won't even touch it. I took away their food and gave them fresh clean water. What should I do?! I don't want them to die [​IMG]
     
  2. Anna_MN

    Anna_MN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2011
    Princeton, MN
    Any help would be appreciated!!!
     
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Their crops are huge because they eat a lot. Have you ever had CXs before?
     
  4. Anna_MN

    Anna_MN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2011
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    I have not had them before but I don't think it's normal for their crops to be THAT big. I understand they will be bigger because of their eating habits but they are on a very strict feeding schedule. I don't let them binge all day long. I fill their 2ft feeder, then after 12 hours I take it away.
     
  5. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Everything you know about chickens has to be thrown out the window when dealing with CXs. They are so genetically engineered as to only vaguely resemble chickens. I have raised several batches over the years, and I love the end result, but they are a serious challenge. Losses are expected, despite your best efforts to prevent them. It is the nature of these birds- they are very fragile despite looking like hulking monsters.

    The sand should be helping to break up the cracked corn until you get some grit. I do not recommend trying to make them vomit because you will likely kill the birds in the process. I still think you are just seeing a normal CX crop, but maybe you can post some pics? That might help to clarify.
     
  6. Anna_MN

    Anna_MN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2011
    Princeton, MN
    I will try to get a clear enough picture for you. The little buggers don't sit still very well for the camera [​IMG]

    Should I keep food away from them until tomorrow when the baby grit gets here? I have regular chick starter (18%) that I could give them.
     
  7. Anna_MN

    Anna_MN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2011
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    I decided to take the birds out one by one and massage their crop, then put them in another container with warm fresh water. They did not have food all day. It did the trick! Their crops were about half the size in two hours, and now they are perfectly fine! I hope this doesn't happen again because massaging 14 meat chickens is not easy!
     
  8. StevieNay

    StevieNay Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 17, 2012
    I was advised to leave food for my chicks around the clock. Is it different with meat birds? Could not having food for 12 hours cause them to binge when you put it back in?

    Glad they're doing better!
     
  9. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    CXs binge period. Their intake needs to be controlled externally because they have no internal mechanisms of control. They will eat , eat, eat until they drop dead or outgrow their legs, and even if they outgrow their legs they will continue to eat if they are parked next to a feeder.
     

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