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Latest uses for chicken manure - or, Where's the Beef?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by PaulaJoAnne, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. PaulaJoAnne

    PaulaJoAnne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2009
    http://www.bae.ncsu.edu/programs/extension/publicat/wqwm/ag61.html
    Guidelines for Feeding Broiler Litter to Beef Cattle

    Beef cattle producers searching for ways to lower feed costs and/or stretch feed
    supplies should consider broiler litter as a possible nutrient source for wintering,
    growing, and finishing rations. When fed in nutritionally balanced rations,
    broiler litter is a valuable source of crude protein and minerals for beef cattle.

    A. Dry, pregnant cows: Feed 35 to 40 lbs. of the litter-silage mixture per day.
    B. Lactating beef cows:

    Average milking ability (beef type): Feed 45 to 50 lbs. of litter treated silage per day.

    Superior milking ability (dairy x beef): Feed 50 to 60 lbs. of litter treated silage per day.
    If cows do not consume this level of feed, 2 to 5 lbs. of corn may be fed with 45 to 50 lbs. of litter treated silage per day.
    C. Stocker calves: Full feed of the litter treated corn silage.

    Grow your own, or, choose pastured/grassfed!
     
  2. purr

    purr Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2008
    east freetown, ma
    And this is why we get sicker and sicker. Waiting for the new Mad Cow Disease. I may go back to being a vegetarian!
     
  3. HorseFeatherz NV

    HorseFeatherz NV Eggink Chickens

    [​IMG]


    What is wrong with people?


    Now my dogs would be all over this feed change. [​IMG]
     
  4. PaulaJoAnne

    PaulaJoAnne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2009
    Quote:Just stop choosing commercial meat, and vote with your money by choosing true grassfed!
     
  5. PaulaJoAnne

    PaulaJoAnne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2009
    Quote:[​IMG] Ain't that the truth!
    ANd people wonder why I will not allow dogs to lick me, especially in the face!
     
  6. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Don't Panic

    5,390
    126
    303
    Aug 13, 2007
    North/Central Florida
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poultry_litter

    Traditionally
    used as fertilizer, it is now also used as a livestock feed as a cost-saving measure compared with other feedstock materials, particularly for beef animals.[1] [2]. This use seems surprising to many, thinking of cows as herbivores. Natural pasture consumed by cattle contains insects, feces, and other matter. Fodder for cattle which is grown commercially is devoid of this.

    Prior to 1967, the use of poultry litter as cattle feed was unregulated but that year the FDA issued a policy statement that poultry litter offered in interstate commerce as animal feed was adulterated effectively banning the practice. In 1980, FDA reversed this policy and passed regulation of litter to the states. In December 2003, in response to a the detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease)in a cow in the state of Washington, the FDA announced plans to put in place a poultry litter ban. Because poultry litter can contain recycled cattle proteins as either spilled feed or feed that has passed through the avian gut, the FDA was concerned that feeding litter would be a pathway for spreading mad cow disease. In 2004, FDA decided to take a more comprehensive approach to BSE that would remove the most infectious proteins from all animal feeds. The FDA decided at this point that a litter ban was unnecessary in part based on comments by the North American Rendering Industry (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Feb03/020603/8004e16b.html). In 2005, the FDA published a proposed rule that did not include a litter ban and in 2008 the final rule did not include the ban either
     
  7. PaulaJoAnne

    PaulaJoAnne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2009
    A.T. Hagan :

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poultry_litter

    Traditionally
    used as fertilizer, it is now also used as a livestock feed as a cost-saving measure compared with other feedstock materials, particularly for beef animals.[1] [2]. This use seems surprising to many, thinking of cows as herbivores. Natural pasture consumed by cattle contains insects, feces, and other matter. Fodder for cattle which is grown commercially is devoid of this.

    Prior to 1967, the use of poultry litter as cattle feed was unregulated but that year the FDA issued a policy statement that poultry litter offered in interstate commerce as animal feed was adulterated effectively banning the practice. In 1980, FDA reversed this policy and passed regulation of litter to the states. In December 2003, in response to a the detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease)in a cow in the state of Washington, the FDA announced plans to put in place a poultry litter ban. Because poultry litter can contain recycled cattle proteins as either spilled feed or feed that has passed through the avian gut, the FDA was concerned that feeding litter would be a pathway for spreading mad cow disease. In 2004, FDA decided to take a more comprehensive approach to BSE that would remove the most infectious proteins from all animal feeds. The FDA decided at this point that a litter ban was unnecessary in part based on comments by the North American Rendering Industry (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Feb03/020603/8004e16b.html). In 2005, the FDA published a proposed rule that did not include a litter ban and in 2008 the final rule did not include the ban either

    Thanks for the extra links!

    I bolded one thing though, as it is a bit misleading. Cows will never voluntarily eat manure.​
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010
  8. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Don't Panic

    5,390
    126
    303
    Aug 13, 2007
    North/Central Florida
    Their own manure, no. Incidental manure in small amounts from other creatures, all the time. Them cattle egrets out there in the pasture with them gotta go just like every other living creature.

    I'm not defending this practice, just pointing out that "grass raised" is never solely just grass.
     
  9. PaulaJoAnne

    PaulaJoAnne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2009
    A.T. Hagan :

    Their own manure, no. Incidental manure in small amounts from other creatures, all the time. Them cattle egrets out there in the pasture with them gotta go just like every other living creature.

    I'm not defending this practice, just pointing out that "grass raised" is never solely just grass.

    I agree fully!​
     

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