Lavender roo and blue wynadotte hen

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by lavmom, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. lavmom

    lavmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all. I am new to having chickens. I have a lavender orpington rooster, two lavender orpington hens, two blue wynadotte hens. Can I put then in the same pen? What will the chicks of the lav roo and blue wynadotte look like?
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  2. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Lav x Blue = 50% blue 50% black.

    Lavender is a recessive gene so you won't see anything out of it until you either breed back to Lavender again or breed the first generation "splits" to each other.
     
  3. lavmom

    lavmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Illia!! I also have two Ole English Bantam lavender mottled hens, which I was told are rare. Would I have to find the exact same in a a rooster? I have no idea where to start with that. [​IMG]
     
  4. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Lavender Mottled = Black Mottled + 2 copies of the Lavender gene. You can find Black Mottled roos to breed with your hens. Offspring will be Black Mottled split to Lavender. If you breed one of these splits back to a Lavender Mottled, 50% of those offspring will be Lavender Mottled, and the other 50% will be Black Mottled split to Lavender.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. lavmom

    lavmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're AWESOME!! Thank you so much!
     
  6. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    When referring to a color/ variety of Old English Game Bantam the color/variety is a Pearl not, "Lavender Mottled".
    Pearl is Self Blue (Lavender) + Mottle.

    Chris .
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012
  7. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is probably true with regards to the proper registration name for the variety, but when asking a genetic question, it's much more clear when using trait terms. For example, if someone didn't know what made a Pearl -- just knew what it looked like and what it was called -- then that person would have a harder time figuring out the proper variety to use for outcrossing and how to predict inheritance for further generations.

    I see this confusion-generating terminology in poultry, and people keep asking the same questions. In the parrot world, however, varieties are not given such confusing names -- the varieties are named based on the genetic traits which compose them. For example, if I showed you a cockatiel lacking orange cheek patches, displaying grayish-brown feathers in patches alternating with white patches, and each grayish-brown feather had a lace pattern to it, you might ask me what the name of that variety is. If I say "cappuccino lace" you wouldn't know anything about the genetics of that variety.

    But rather than some strange name, the cockatiel I described is called (in the trade) "Cinnamon Pearl Pied Whiteface" which is a list of the genes involved. I think this system is much more efficient and less confusing than what goes on with chickens, where the exact same combination of genetic traits can be given completely different names when they appear in different breeds. With chickens, something relatively easy to learn (genetics) is made unnecessarily difficult because of the need to translate between the "registered variety names" and the mix of traits necessary to make the bird look that way.

    Just my opinion.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. lavmom

    lavmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks AquaEyes!! I was using the description I got when I purchased them [​IMG]
     

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