Lavender turkey question

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by justinszoo, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. justinszoo

    justinszoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a pair of turkeys that were sold to me as blue slates. The hen is actually a lavender though. Both of her parents were normal looking though. I saw them. They look just like my tom. What can I expect from the eggs and would they still be considered pure eggs?
     
  2. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    "Blue slate" follows the same genetic inheritance pattern as the blue in chickens. As in they also produce blacks, blues and splashes.. "lavender" is simply the turkey "splash" version. Confusing I know..

    A black is simply a bird with no blue genes, a blue/blue slate is a bird with ONE copy of blue gene, and splash/lavender are birds with TWO copies of the blue gene. (I am using chicken/turkey in this paragraph to help in case you were already familiar with how blue works in chickens).

    Lavender in chickens is completely different from the lavender in chickens, in chickens lavender is an another mutant gene that is recessive. It is mere coincidence they share the same name.

    So if you understand this, you will realize that "Blue Slate" does not breed true.. always throwing blacks and/or lavenders along more of the blue slates depending on how they were bred.

    As for your pair, blue x lavender= 50% blue slate 50% lavender. If they do not show any off color such as white and/or bronze feathers peppered through their bodies then can be sold as "blue slates" and "lavenders". The black flecks on blues is normal though.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2008
  3. justinszoo

    justinszoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Kev!! That makes sense, just takes a minute to process. The tom does have the black flecks. I will post pics later.
     
  4. warcard

    warcard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just a question?

    I thought the lavender (all light gray/blue no black specks) was like self-blue, and what is called Blue Slate (more steel gray with black specks) was splash?

    I was told the problem with breeding lavender to lavender is that you slowly wash the color out and you need the birds with black specks or even a black bird (occasionally) to keep the color.

    eg.
    lavender (bb) x lavender (bb) = only lavender (bb)

    lavender (bb) x blue slate (bs) = blue slate (bs) & lavender (bb)

    blue slate (bs) x blue slate (bs) = lavender (bb), blue slate (bs), & black (ss)

    Not trying to muddy the waters, just clarifying what I was told [​IMG]
     
  5. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Justin, you probably really do have a blue slate and a lavender.

    warcard, yes lavenders are solid soft color and blue slates are splashed with black.. the problem comes when trying to compare them with chickens- as in assuming the lavenders and splashes in chickens and turkeys are the "same". Not sure if that's where you're coming from or not:

    I thought the lavender (all light gray/blue no black specks) was like self-blue, and what is called Blue Slate (more steel gray with black specks) was splash?

    I can't tell if you are saying it's like the self blue in chickens or like a solid even color... the former, no it's not as for the latter, yes. Blue slates are supposed to be splashed, but again it's completely different from the splash in chickens, genetically as splash in chickens is due to being pure for blue but blue slate splashiness is due to having only one blue gene.

    One Blue Slate gene in turkeys makes a gray splashy bird. Two Blue Slate genes makes a solid soft colored bird- which got called Lavender by people.

    In chickens, the term splash goes to a blue chicken with two blue genes(whitish with black flecks). Lavender in chickens is due to a completely different mutant that makes a soft solid color that is recessive breeds true. Thinking the chicken and turkey versions are analogs due to name and appearence is a mistake.

    I don't know about washing out in lavenders, however eye problems(such as too small eyes) and poor vision is a not uncommon problem with lavenders.​
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2008
  6. Must Be Losing It

    Must Be Losing It Lost It

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    So I have to ask this question since you guys are so knowledgeable. I was at a chicken swap over the weekend and two blue slates were selling for $100. Is this normal for the breed?

    I bought two eggs for $5.00 each with my fingers crossed. Can I start dreaming of retirement? [​IMG]
     
  7. warcard

    warcard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Must Be - Maybe, I sold a year old hen for $30. I might be able to stretch a full grow tom to $50, but somehow I doubt it in my area.

    Kev - thanks, note to self do not compare turkeys to chickens they just aren't in the same weight class [​IMG] :eek: [​IMG]
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    lol good one. I do often wish there was more "standardization" of names for colors and patterns throughout the domestic poultry world. Lavender in this case is an good example of inconsistency causing confusion. Even a term like "double slate" instead of "lavender" for turkeys would work so much better even if it may be rather descriptive name of how they look..

    Prices- it varies so wildly. Some will gasp in horror and start carrying on if you quote 15.. yet others will take 30-40 instantaneously with no attempt at bargaining. I even sold turkeys for 40 each, for barely half grown ones while standing in line at an auction waiting to put birds in sale cages.. previous times they only sold for 15 each during the auction.
     
  9. 2manyhats

    2manyhats Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At auction in our area, heritage breeds are selling at about $40 each. A poult is $7-15 depending on how many want it. This year raising poultry for food has become very popular in our area (mostly dairy farms). So, getting good stock can become pricey.
     
  10. justinszoo

    justinszoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I paid $25 for my pair, found them on kijiji.
     

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