1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Layena Pellet Refusal

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by CasperChick, Feb 3, 2015.

  1. CasperChick

    CasperChick New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Feb 3, 2015
    I have been feeding Blue Seal extra egg, but I recently grabbed a bag of Layena when I was running low.
    Day 1. Complete refusal to eat
    Days 2-4. Eating more each day
    Day 5. Egg production down by 50%
    Day 6. Got Blue Seal. Fed both feeds in two bowls, Blue Seal feed all gone and most of Layena remaining at the end of the day.

    Has anyone else seen this type of issue with Layena Pellets?
     
  2. CasperChick

    CasperChick New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Feb 3, 2015
    I should add that they are supplemented with wheat and white millet, and occasional scratch (cracked corn, etc).
     
  3. JadedPhoenix

    JadedPhoenix Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,208
    120
    206
    Oct 29, 2012
    Tyro-Lexington, NC
    Some chickens hate change. I tend to blend the end of one bag of food with the new bag to help with this issue. Your sudden change from what they were used to probably has a lot to do with the reaction you got. Do your best to not completely run out from now on to give a smoother transition from one food to another and you'll be fine. I would go ahead and mix the two brands you have now and the Layena will get gone faster than if you continue to feed separately.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. CasperChick

    CasperChick New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Feb 3, 2015
    The guinea are getting the rest of that bag; I need to get the chickens egg production back up so they can pay for their feed!

    Guinea are just grateful to have their own feed station (normally they free-range, but winter weather has been keeping them inside, and they are not the best mates for the chickens!).
     
  5. DaveOmak

    DaveOmak Chillin' With My Peeps

    643
    86
    128
    May 18, 2013
    Omak, Washington
    My Coop
    Were the feeds the same texture.... pellets or ground... Jaded Phoenix is correct about change... mix feeds for a week or so.... 10%, 20%, 30%, etc.... on a daily basis....
     
  6. DrMikelleRoeder

    DrMikelleRoeder Chillin' With My Peeps

    132
    7
    50
    Nov 3, 2014
    Hi CasperChick

    It is not uncommon for birds to turn their noses to new feed. In general, as you transition from one diet to another, it is important to have a transition period (7-10 days) where you mix the feeds together. This will help avoid digestive upsets and allow your birds to get used to the taste and texture of their new feed. Of course, in this case, you were in a bind and didn’t have any other choice, which is just another day in the life of a flock owner. [​IMG]

    When it comes to changing feeds, some flocks can be a bit more picky that others, especially if you are consistently feeding them the same diet. Like fussy children who don’t like eating their vegetables, chickens that are offered a new feed may not take to it right away, but if left with no other choice, they will start eating it and eventually enjoy their new diet. It isn’t surprising that your hens opted for their original diet when it was re-introduced a week later. They are creatures of habit and will want to go back to the feed that they are more accustomed to.

    In addition, physical form can play a big role; birds who have been on crumbles can require some time to get used to eating pellets, and vice versa. If your birds were eating crumbles, and you bought Purina[​IMG] Layena[​IMG] Pellets, that is actually a double-whammy in terms of changing their diet. We have observed the same response in birds offered pellets that were the exact same formula as their crumbles. You indicated that on days 2-4, the birds were increasing their intake, so they were adjusting. The drop in egg production was very likely the result of a day of not eating, followed by a few days of sup-optimal intake. Producing an egg every day is a tremendously energy-demanding process; just one day of greatly reduced intake has been known to throw birds into a molt. Whenever you get into a situation where you must abruptly change feeds, at least try to get the same physical form – it will make the transition easier. I suspect that had you continued with the Purina[​IMG] Layena[​IMG] Pellets, a few more days, the birds would have been back to normal intake and production levels.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by