Laying Broken Eggs...Egg Drop Syndrome OR??

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by New Flockman, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    We have two Rhode Island Red hens a bit over two years old. Both did their first molts over winter. At that time we had trouble with thin shelled eggs, which I gather is common during the molt. Lately, we've been getting thinnish-shelled eggs that are white and really have a rough surface. This is intermittant. Lately, we've found shell-less eggs under the roost bar and after a bit of investigation, determined they came from Peaches. Within the past couple of days, Peaches has had two incidents of laying broken eggs, one discovered just last night and one on Friday during one of our "flock walks" where she suddenly sat down in the grass, wouldn't move and ended up laying this broken egg. the other hen, Phoebe, really went after it and was actually pulling the egg-gunk out of Peaches' vent. Peaches is behaving normally and has her usual amount of energy and appetite.

    I plan to have a look at Peaches this morning, clean her up a bit and think about what to do. In perusing various sources, Egg Drop Syndrome comes up and fits most of the symptoms to a tee. I wonder if a thin shelled egg can break inside a chicken that perhaps a little to active while carrying the egg?

    If I end up digitally probing her vent, is there any special lubricant I should be using? We were thinking of olive oil. We don't really have much else in the house except for some Vaseline.

    Peaches is the sweetest little chicken and we are really worried.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,217
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    I recommend that you provide them crushed oyster shell, free choice, or add finely crushed eggshells (after boiling the eggs) in their feed. Either will provide enough calcium to harden the shells.
    I agree that there may be whites or yolk inside her which can cause a bacterial infection. Mix 1 tablespoon of white vinegar to 1 quart of water. Use a large syringeful (without needle) of the mixture and put the syringe just inside her vent and gently flush. Do this for about 3-4 times. The liquid may or may not run out her vent, this is normal. This will prevent a bacterial infection, like a douche.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    Thanks. Did a little vent inspection and didn't find anything lingering. Waiting to see if she lays another egg. We give them the oyster shells.. even mix it in their mash as well as in a separate bowl. Plus, we give them a liquid mineral supplement that has calcium in it. One hen is laying perfect eggs, pretty much daily. Peaches is not as regular... every other day is normal for her, or two days in a row, then a break. She isn't too long from her molt and the other hen is going through a mild bully phase right now. No serious but Peaches is sensitive to it and that may effect her egg-laying. Learning so much about chickens and having fun.... even though there are some nail biting moments that come when you get attached to them.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I see that you are in the U.S. We really don't have Egg Drop Syndrome here, I'm led to understand. There are so many reproductive issues, especially with high production breeds like the RIR. Are they hatchery stock? If so, two years of age is the age when you begin seeing the beginnings of trouble. I lost every single hatchery RIR and Wyandotte, plus some of my BRs and Buff Orps to internal laying/egg yolk peritonitis. It's very, very common. Their genetics are just not made for longevity and hens are the only animal on the planet who get spontaneous ovarian cancers like human women.

    A time for egg issues to start is very often just as they are coming through their first big molt, as your birds are.

    If you look up some of my threads/posts here in Emergencies, you will see what you may be facing, though I'm not saying that it's a given that your hens are starting up with this. Could just be the molt depletion.

    Here is a link to a thread which contains several links you may want to read up on for the future, just in case:


    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...ences-on-egg-reproduction-production-necropsy
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  5. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    Thanks Speckledhen.

    Update is that Peaches is still her happy-go-lucky self. She laid one other soft shelled egg so far. But it made it all the way out without breaking. We have under close observation and are focusing on all the calcium supplements we can get into her.
     
  6. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    Final update is that Peaches has laid a couple of normal eggs now, followed by one soft shell, but she continues to be her normal self. We are no longer worried about her.
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Some hens eat enough calcium but do not process it well. Vitamin D can help with that. A good avian vitamin/mineral/amino acid supplement might help to a degree.
     
  8. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    Thanks. Will research that. We would hate to lose Peaches. She is such a sweet bird.
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Avia Charge 2000 is a concentrate powder that is excellent, over 70 vitamins, minerals and amino acids. It seems very expensive, but goes a super long way. It has to be ordered online, but in a pinch, you could use liquid polyvisol baby vitamins without the iron (comes with or without) in the water or a couple of drops in the beak or something she eats like plain yogurt on a daily basis for awhile and see if that helps.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  10. New Flockman

    New Flockman Out Of The Brooder

    59
    0
    39
    Dec 8, 2011
    Northwest Ohio
    Actually, that's the stuff we give them now. They really slurp it up and Peaches goes for it the most. We have it available for them every day now. After your first post I read the label and when I came back to tell you what we were using, you had added the post with a pic!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by