laying & hatching the old fashion way(in a nutshell)

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mispollitos, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not interested in an incubator but was considering buying a hen, since I have a rooster, and raising some chicks in hopes to get some laying hens. We live in Mexico where I'm not going to be buying imported chicks from the US but "mutts" from a friend of a friend. Before I do this, I was hoping to get some points straight.

    1)If a hen starts laying, with intent to brood, she'll automatically stop laying eggs after say 6 eggs and sit on those for 21 days?

    2)After 21 days the eggs will hatch if they're all good?

    3)Unless the hen pecks, with intent to kill, the chicks, they can live with her? Our climate is mild year round.
     
  2. thebirdguy

    thebirdguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hens will lay eggs without intending to brood... once they become broody... they stop laying eggs but there is no magic number that they will lay before setting.. there is also no guarantee that your hen will ever get broody.

    Eggs generally take 21 days of incubation to hatch.. this can vary a day or two either direction depending on a multiplicity of factors.

    Most hens that go broody make good mothers and will raise their chicks..

    Best of luck on your new endeavor...
     
  3. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thank you, I hope I get one that wants to brood [​IMG]
     
  4. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    My Coop
    Quote:Yeah, me too. Unfortunately, despite having breeds that are said to frequently go broody (Buff Orpingtons and a Speckled Sussex), I've never had a hen consider it for even a day. I finally broke down and made an incubator just before Christmas. I'm on day 14 of my first hatch now.
     
  5. Teach97

    Teach97 Bantam Addict

    Nov 12, 2008
    Hooker, OK
    the various game birds are known for going broody plus if you ask around I am sure you can find someone that has some hens known for going broody...just ask for hens out of those hens...
     
  6. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it's still unclear to me how to tell the difference from fertile eggs that a hen can go broody on and the fresh eggs. We have 2 nesting boxes and plan to have 5 hens & I have a rooster. Also, how old does the rooster have to be before he can fertilize? My rooster was the runt and he is quite a chicken, hehe still doesn't cockle doodle doo yet...he's about 20 weeks now.
     
  7. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    bump
     
  8. spartacus_63

    spartacus_63 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The key to success in your plan is a broody hen. I have three and as previously stated, there is no magic number on the eggs, but with my girls the number is generally between 10 & 13. Check out my Bio-Bator link at the bottom of my post for some general info.

    Good luck on the fuzzy butts and beware of chicken math. [​IMG]
     
  9. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that was quite an adventure!

    So, it sounds like you let them lay 10-13 eggs & then when they start brooding, hopefully no one else will lay eggs there? I don't have a separate brooding box. Our climate is spring time year round. It does drop down into the 40's at night...high desert. I've thought that we may have to let the rooster free range because, like I said, we only have 1 chicken tractor that houses 5 chickens & has 2 laying boxes for the coop area. Has anyone ever marked their eggs to tell the difference? The marked ones stay the unmarked get taken in the house? or will the hens not brood on a marked egg for identification purposes? Or does this put the fresher eggs at risk of being fertilized?
     
  10. mispollitos

    mispollitos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    bump
     

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