Laying patterns?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mccaffertyln, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. mccaffertyln

    mccaffertyln New Egg

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    Hi All!

    I have an Ameraucana that is about 30 weeks and just starting laying about 12 days ago. We got three eggs from her, one every other day for the first 6 days. Now, for the last 6 days we haven't gotten any eggs from her. Is this normal egglaying behavior? I had a chicken that was egg bound and died so I especially nervous. She is acting completely fine, so nothing different behavior wise, just hasn't been laying!!

    TIA!!
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Some hens and breeds aren't regular layers, and eggs are laid sporadically and without a pattern. Some start and stop. If the hen acts fine she generally is. Egg bound hens get quite ill and will look unwell. If they are eating drinking and scratching they are usually fine.
     
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  3. ChatKath47

    ChatKath47 Out Of The Brooder

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    What I'd like to know is what is the longest "dry spell" that is normal? My two Amerucanas molted in late October, have not laid since then. My Leghorn molted in early December when it was so bitterly cold, and has not started up yet. I know our cold winter for thee months, colder and more snowy than usual, could be the cause, but I am concerned because others I know with chickens either just slowed down, or didn't stop laying. I am worried that something is wrong, or that there is something I need to do. Any advice or suggestions?
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    There are very few 'normal' hard numbers...they are living animals and individuals to boot.
    Some breeds lay like gang busters, others do not.

    There are many variables that can contribute to laying production.
    Length of daylight is the most important..... age, feed, and housing can play a big part too.

    Birds that are molting need more protein and less calcium.

    Ameraucana, or most likely Easter Eggers, are notoriously inconsistent layers.
     
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    I've had true Americana as well as Easter eggers stop laying for months on end than lay for a few weeks and that was it for the season. Breeding behind the birds will dictate laying usually. Some follow a more natural cycle, which means they only lay a clutch or two a season, and may and may not go broody before stopping.

    Hens laying continuously is actually an abnormal state that humans have bred for in chickens.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
  6. ChatKath47

    ChatKath47 Out Of The Brooder

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    My Amerucanas lay two eggs in a space of three days, have done so the last two years, but the Leghorn is consistent and lays daily. About the time I was asking this question, I went out to feed the chickens some scrambled eggs and rolled oats, a favorite of theirs, and just out of curiosity, went around and looked in the nest box -- TA-DA!! A nice green egg was there! I had a hunch Samantha would be laying soon as her comb had turned red, and Jane, the other Amerucana, still has the dull pink comb. The Leghorn, Blondie, is now sporting a brightening comb and I expect she'll be egging soon. I give them Feather Fixer as it says it's good for their feathers and makes stronger eggshells. I pulverize their eggshells and mix in with their feed, along with Rooster Booster for vitamins and scratch as I read it helps create internal heat - thus I don't crack corn them during warm weather. They seem healthy, like to peck around in the grass and are very alert, so am no longer concerned about their diet and nutrition. I guess the long cold spell was related to the weather and the conditions. We kept a heat lamp in the chicken yard all winter long, it was pointed at the doorway of the coop and is not directly shining in the nesting area. They seemed to like it as we'd see them huddled together in the glow of the light.

    Funny story: I went out to change the water and replenish the feed during a rather cold day and as I was in the chicken yard, Blondie, who was in molt at the time and had few feathers, was sitting in the doorway in the light of the lamp, neck stretched upward, eyes closed, standing there as if she was enjoying the warm glow and the heat and reminded me of a sunbather at the beach catching some rays, just needed a blanket and sunglasses!
     

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