Leaving a light on in the coop 24 hours a day?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Bullitt, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas
    I recently met a person who has a chicken coop and keeps a light on 24 hours a day. This is in Texas where it doesn't get very cold, so the light is mostly to encourage egg-laying. The chickens also have 24-hour access to the coop and the run that are fully protected from predators.

    But I do not understand why a person would leave a light on 24 hours a day.

    Any thoughts on this?
     
  2. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Don't have an answer but I was wondering the same thing. And how much is to much light. right now I have a timer and I only give them 6 hours of dark but I don't know if that's healthy for them. But they are laying great!
     
  3. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas
    Everything I have read says provide enough light so that chickens have 14 hours of light. I do not see any need to provide more light than that.

    I am guessing that leaving a light on 24 hours a day will not cause any health problems. I would guess chickens can sleep just fine with the light on.

    I did notice his chickens in the run after dark. I am not sure if this is a result of the coop light or what.
     
  4. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps


    Mine also have access to the run at night with roost space so the don't have to be in the light. They started to slow down egg laying but once they got the extra light they shot right back up to 5-6 eggs a week! If I don't see any signs of agitation then I think I will leave it just like it is.
     
  5. beththornton

    beththornton New Egg

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    Sep 16, 2013
    Northeast Texas
    My Coop
    I'm in Texas too, and I know people who leave a light bulb burning 24/7. I never have had anything but a little solar light just outside the coop so I could see if I needed to go out there after dark.

    BUT... this week-end, unusually cold temps are invading Texas from the North. We could drop from 78 degrees today to 15 degrees at night in a few days. So....We just ran a heavy extension cord to our coop to use for heat. Should we use a red heat lamp, a white heat lamp or just a light bulb? Our 6 barred rocks are NOT accustomed to cold weather any where near this cold. The front half of my coop is open air, screened in porch-like. We've covered up all but the South side with heavy plastic. Should I cover the south side too? This cold weather thing is not part of my experience, esp with Chickens. The dogs and cats just sleep in the house. Husband doesn't want chickens in the bed with us. O well. What's the next best plan? Please advise.
     
  6. Shadow722

    Shadow722 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2013
    Outlying Oklahoma City
    I'm in Oklahoma and I have a light on a time that comes on at 3:30am and I have it go off after sunrise. I have one in the coop and a drop light that shines in the pen where their food and water is. Once the lights come on they come out of the coop and get some food and water and go back in the coop to stay a little warmer I guess. I currently have 13 laying hens in that coop and they had droppend down to less than 5 eggs a day until I got that light on and now I am getting 8 to 12 eggs a day from them.
     
  7. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think red or white make the same amount of heat but red seems to keep them calmer when there chicks.......
     
  8. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas
    I think if you close up most of the coop you should not need a heat lamp or anything. There are people on this board in Canada and Alaska who do not heat their coops.

    I understand it is a big drop in temperature, but I think the chickens should be fine if the coop is mostly closed up. They do need a little ventilation, though.
     

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