Leaving turkeys to roost in the trees over night?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Kacey I15, Jun 26, 2015.

  1. Kacey I15

    Kacey I15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Just walked outside to see her in the tree roosting wasn't sure if I should leave her be or bring her in coop I was wondering what most of you would have done I did bring her in the coop.
     
  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    If you don't have raccoons, or owls, or ice storms in the winter? Probably not a problem. Ours were returned to the shed (bow and arrow to shoot a leader over the occupied limb - followed by nylon cord on which a couple of, punched through, empty, gallon water jugs had been "attached" - point spotlight at ground where the "landing"/capture zone was defined). Run the gallon jugs along occupied limb (one person on each end of the line - sliding jugs into roosting turkey(s)) - turkeys fly into light and back to the shed they'd go. Once had our first two jennies parked on top of the chimney with a severe thunderstorm rolling in (that was an interesting removal job). However, after the first month of absolutely consistent requirement that the shed was "home roost" - never have had another problem (adult hens do the instruction of their poults - no need for human intervention in over 10 years - and there are 60-80 ft. Hickories in runs and surrounding runs). [​IMG] [​IMG] Also helps to provide some "day roosts" to decrease any "temptation": [​IMG]
     
  3. Kacey I15

    Kacey I15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow very cool! Thank you for sharing!
     
  4. turksinmaine

    turksinmaine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    we have both raccoons and at least one ,good sized, owl real close by. What harm would either do to a turkey?
     
  5. Kacey I15

    Kacey I15 Out Of The Brooder

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    We leave back in the woods a bit but never seen a owl really close to the house but we seen raccoons not to often by the house but we have before
     
  6. SuperLuke

    SuperLuke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Never leave your birds outside of the coop at night they will be killed
     
  7. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    Raccoons are responsible for many turkey deaths. I have lost poults but not adult turkeys to Great Horned Owls.
     
  8. JonathanL23

    JonathanL23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Owls will kill young turks , raccoon will kill young or old. Turkeys roost in trees or up high when they sleep for protection purposes. they will be ok in the tree but safer in the coop.
     
  9. johnjaha

    johnjaha New Egg

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    Oct 12, 2015
    how do your turkeys get down from the high roost? Do they fly straight down or jump to a lower roost. I am having problems with my turkeys hurting themselves from high spots. I am guessing I have BB bronze....didnt know that when we got them as poults.
     
  10. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Provide the BB's low roosts 2"x4" wide side up - at no more than head ht. Other members have had luck just providing a few bales of straw that they can "perch" on. Same thing with areas they like to hunker down on during day (plenty of straw/dry bedding}. If you are planning on keeping these guys - don't let them fly (poor guys got to land and that hardly ever works out well) and watch their diets - soft bedding on ground helps keep breast blisters (pressure sores) from developing when they start to get "heavy".

    Once they get a bit bigger all you really need do is provide a secure area with plenty of dry bedding/straw bales - as they'll be perfectly happy hunkering down without benefit of roost, if they feel safe.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015

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