Leg color heritability question :)

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Cowgirl71, Aug 6, 2010.

  1. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found a link to this site: https://www.backyardchickens.com/legchart/leg%20color%20chart.htm
    After
    studying it, I have a question: When you cross a homozygous yellow rooster with a homozygous yellow hen, why would the pullets have blue slate legs (and the roos yellow). It confuses me. Because if I were to breed a purebred RIR roo to a purebred RIR hen (both would have yellow legs), their chicks (both sexes) would have yellow legs. But according to this chart, I'd get pullets with blue slate legs, and roos with yellow legs. [​IMG]

    I was impressed with part of this chart because I have 15 BO x BR Sex-Link pullets, and I was trying to find out why they had yellow, willow green, blue slate, and white legs. Where'd the blue and green come from? But, according to the chart, it makes complete sense... The rooster (their father) was "not pure" for his white leg color (he IS a hatchery bird).

    But anyway, I'm hoping somebody knows. [​IMG]
     
  2. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Aug 8, 2010
  3. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Last edited: Aug 10, 2010
  4. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are 2 genes in play.
    One gene is the sexlinked inhibitor of dermal melanin Id. Options pale shanks (Id) or wildtype shanks (id+).
    The other gene is for White skin (W+/?) or yellow skin (=w/w).

    yellow shanks = Id/(?) w/w
    white shanks = Id/(?) W+/?
    willow shanks = id+/(id+) w/w
    slate shanks = id+/(id+) W+/?

    ? indicates that the second gene could be either option (eg W+ or w).
    () indicates that the hen doesn't have that second gene.

    A yellow shanked rooster could hide id+ and give willow shanked daughters with a yellow legged hen.
     
  5. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you! [​IMG]
     

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