Leg won't bear weight: hawk strike injury

NH-Song

Chirping
Apr 18, 2019
39
73
84
New Hampshire, USA
Yesterday, one of my young Olive Eggers was injured in a hawk strike. My husband heard her screaming and I ran out and scared off the hawk. The poor hen (Enid, the nicest and gentlest of the four Olives) had a single slice through the skin of her left breast, which I treated and have wrapped up, but her right leg won't bear weight.

It doesn't appear to be broken anywhere, all of the joints work easily, and from what I can feel, all of the tendons are still in place. She can move her toes (she was holding onto my finger hard enough to pinch, while I was trying to wrap her leg up to her body to keep her from continuing to try to use it), but the foot and leg are noticeably colder than her left.

Right now she's inside my basement, lying down propped up on a pile of bedding (in an open-topped plastic bin) with water, food, and one of her buddies, but I don't know what else to do.

How can I tell where her leg is injured?

(ETA: All the other hens are under cover and were uninjured. For now, until we figure out how to suspend orange netting over their full run, they'll remain under cover in the covered run. Given that it's currently really cold and windy, they're mostly okay with that, but they clearly miss the choice to go out and poke around.)
 

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chickenlover007

Crowing
Sep 21, 2020
412
2,587
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PNW
Yesterday, one of my young Olive Eggers was injured in a hawk strike. My husband heard her screaming and I ran out and scared off the hawk. The poor hen (Enid, the nicest and gentlest of the four Olives) had a single slice through the skin of her left breast, which I treated and have wrapped up, but her right leg won't bear weight.

It doesn't appear to be broken anywhere, all of the joints work easily, and from what I can feel, all of the tendons are still in place. She can move her toes (she was holding onto my finger hard enough to pinch, while I was trying to wrap her leg up to her body to keep her from continuing to try to use it), but the foot and leg are noticeably colder than her left.

Right now she's inside my basement, lying down propped up on a pile of bedding (in an open-topped plastic bin) with water, food, and one of her buddies, but I don't know what else to do.

How can I tell where her leg is injured?

(ETA: All the other hens are under cover and were uninjured. For now, until we figure out how to suspend orange netting over their full run, they'll remain under cover in the covered run. Given that it's currently really cold and windy, they're mostly okay with that, but they clearly miss the choice to go out and poke around.)
I don't know how to help, but I'll tag two people who might. Sending comfort and hugs, Good luck! @Eggcessive @Weeg
 

Weeg

Crossing the Road
Jul 1, 2020
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Don't wrap it. Incorrectly wrapping will do MUCH more harm then good starting with trappy bacteria. Plus that wrap looks like it is way to tight. Can you post pictures of the cut unwrapped? How did you treat the wound?

As for her leg, it is possible she sprained it reign to escape. It is very likely actually. Put her in a chicken sling or in a small area where she can't move much or stress the leg out. Something like a dog kennel. Does hs seem to be in shock any more? Add AC vinegar, sugar, or electrolytes to her water for a boost. If she is kept a low activity for a few days, and sprain will likely heal its self and her leg will start to feel better, and she will start to walk more. Don't wrap her leg to her body, instead just use the bin you have, and turn it into a chicken sling. Here is a great video. Is sh eating/drinking/pooping fine? Make her when you unwrap the wound, that she is in a warm, place where no flies will get in it, and lay eggs. Hope this helps! Sorry about your baby! :hugs
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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It is hard to say what is going on with her leg without an xray by a vet. She might have suffered a sprain or some nerve damage by the strike from the hawk. Hopefully, she doesn’t have any internal injuries. What are you using to clean the wound? Vetericyn, 2% chlorhexidene, or saline can be used to clean the wound twice a day. Plain Neosporin or Triple Antibiotic Ointment can be applied to the wound after cleaning it. It can be good to use a clean towel for bedding and leave the wound open to air. I would keep her quiet in a basket or dog crate near food and water. Hopefully, the leg will get better with some time and supportive care. If vet care is available, that would be best.
 

NH-Song

Chirping
Apr 18, 2019
39
73
84
New Hampshire, USA
Oh! I can certainly put neosporin on it and leave it open to the air. I was using chlorhexidine spray (sold as antimicrobial for fowl, but I don't remember the brand off hand). I'll put a towel down over the flake bedding so she can be propped up (she gets cranky if she's lying flat on her side).

Okay, I watched that video and 1. she's adorable and great and 2. I can absolutely do that for Enid. I left her overnight with the wound covered with neosporin and open to the air. She was eating, but I haven't been able to get her to drink. I'll keep trying, and I'll put electrolytes in the water.

Thank you SO SO MUCH for your help and advice.
 

Weeg

Crossing the Road
Jul 1, 2020
11,332
30,368
986
Small town in Western Washington
My Coop
My Coop
Fluids are most important. Even if you have to syringe her water in the long run, water is very important.
I left her overnight with the wound covered with neosporin and open to the air.
Did you still have it wrapped, or not? Don't wrap it, its not going to help to have it wrapped. Can we see some pictures of the slice on her chest? Great job taking care of her, and the clorhexadine is great! Keep up the good work!
 

NH-Song

Chirping
Apr 18, 2019
39
73
84
New Hampshire, USA
I left it unwrapped and uncovered last night, but smeared liberally with neosporin. The wound appears to be granularizing and closing over. I hope.

Today, I made this sling - doesn't she look like very disgruntled laundry? Poor thing.

I will have to buy a syringe; I don't have one and I forgot to get one while I was out today buying sling supplies. I'm going to bring a bottle downstairs and see if I can get her more interested in drinking.

Now that she's in the sling, do I just put food in a little bowl in front of her and water her several times a day? She can't really get to food and water on her own this way.

Again, I'm so grateful to you guys for holding my hand during this. I've had chickens for just about a year and a half now, and this is the first hawk attack and sick/injured chicken I've had.
 

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