legs paralized and sticking out in front...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mmaddie's mom, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is NOT an emergency... I have no hens with this problem right now but have had 3 with this and had to be put down... sooo, I would like to avoid this ever again if I can.
    It starts with stumbling and not being able to walk very well (weakness)... progresses to legs paralized, stiff and out front and sitting on their butts. Legs can be moved by me so are not locked but appear so as they sit. They continue to eat and drink but only when I move the food/water close enough. Also, this did not happen at the same time, so I don't believe it was "caught" by one from the other? All have been young Seabrights (under a year)... could this be a genetic thing?
     
  2. dede_pira

    dede_pira Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Gilbert, AZ
    Oh, I am so sorry you put the chicks down!
    I had the same problem starting last week, posted here for help but nobody replied.
    I will not give up on this sweet chick. She is the nicest in my flock and only 3 and a half weeks old.
    I tried making her the bandaid/cardboard shoes but that only made it worse, so I left her alone, but forced water on her beak about 3 times a day. I half expected her to be dead next morning, but she was ok, so I went to the pet store and bought Avitron (vitamin for birds and small animals). It is liquid and you put 6 drops for every tablespoon of water.
    I picked up the chick carefully and used the eyedropper to force her to drink some vitamin water mix. She was so feeble that she didn't resist.
    Later in the day she was eating really well and much more alert. That was over the weekend, and I would give her 4 or 5 drops of vitamin every 3 hours or so.
    Today a miracle happened! She was still sitting on her butt for a bit, but after a while she will stand up on both her feet (!) and walk across the box to the other side. She is a little wobbly on her feet, but they do work!!!
    I hope this helps you!
    Oh, and all we could come up with for an explanation, was that she either fell and got stuck too close to the heat lamp or that she had some sort of cerebral palsy caused by heat. I since then moved the lamp a ways away because they should be off of it pretty soon.

    Love and light,

    Dede
     
  3. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    mmaddie's mom :

    This is NOT an emergency... I have no hens with this problem right now but have had 3 with this and had to be put down... sooo, I would like to avoid this ever again if I can.
    It starts with stumbling and not being able to walk very well (weakness)... progresses to legs paralized, stiff and out front and sitting on their butts. Legs can be moved by me so are not locked but appear so as they sit. They continue to eat and drink but only when I move the food/water close enough. Also, this did not happen at the same time, so I don't believe it was "caught" by one from the other? All have been young Seabrights (under a year)... could this be a genetic thing?

    Moldy feed can cause those very symptoms, especially if the eating and drinking continues as usual. It causes permanant neurological damage and cannot be repaired. I lost a lovely rooster last year to the results of moldy feed after a heavy season of rain.​
     
  4. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    So glad your chick is doing better! I tried the same vitamins but to no avail. These were full grown birds, just young. Hated loosing them. Continue the good work with your baby!
    thanks.
    dmb
     
  5. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Moldy feed? Good to know. It did kinda look like a neuro problem. Will keep my eyes open. Thanks
    dmb
     
  6. b.hromada

    b.hromada Flock Mistress

    Quote:Moldy feed can cause those very symptoms, especially if the eating and drinking continues as usual. It causes permanant neurological damage and cannot be repaired. I lost a lovely rooster last year to the results of moldy feed after a heavy season of rain.

    I've got a little Silkie Roo here with those same syptoms. [​IMG] But my feed was not moldy, that I know of. I keep the feed inside, inside a galvanized can. [​IMG] I don't want to put him down, as he does not seem to be in pain, just has to have the food and water dish near him, like you said. Will certainly keep an eye out for moldy feed though. Thanks for letting us know. [​IMG]
     
  7. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mistress... keep us informed... would like to know your outcome... good luck with your roo!
     
  8. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    After my sad experience I have started checking the feed for "clumps" before I even leave the store. I've also spotted moldy bales of straw at the feed store, so I am extra vigilant now.
     
  9. kelar

    kelar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 22, 2010
    yacolt
    This sounds like Marek's Disease. There is a lot of information online and in these forums that you should probably check out. You can vaccinate for it & probably should as once it is in your flock or on your property, exposure is certain.
     
  10. mmaddie's mom

    mmaddie's mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Lost the last bird over a year ago... no further outbreaks... doesn't seem to have spread?
     

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