Lent holidays

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by EweSheep, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    OK folks, what do you eat on Lent?

    What do you do during Lent?

    What you can not have on Lent?

    Please, no religious debates, just the usual food, activities and all the family and friends kind of fun during Lent. I remember my good friend in HS that could not eat red meat on her Lent days and lost weight. I dont think she could have bread either.
     
  2. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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  3. Sierra pachie bars

    Sierra pachie bars Queen of the Lost

    Nov 8, 2008
    Your supposed to fast. No more then one meal. We do meatless meals on Fridays. But I think you can have bread because we do. I married a catholic so I am a bit rusty on the detail. You are allowed fish, thats why mc donalds started the fish sandwich.

    Sometimes I just do mac and cheese , not to hard to miss meat here and there. My daughter doesn't like meat anyways so she doesn't miss it.
     
  4. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Oh yes, I remember my friend fasting for this holiday! I think she only could have supper but how long does Lent last? She was Catholic.
     
  5. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    And she does go to church twice a day on Sunday and Wednesday nights for prayer with her church. I do not know if they do prayers every night for how long, half an hour to an hour? I am not sure of their customs tho.

    Don't the kids eat something during Lent? It seems like to me kids would go hungry.
     
  6. feather and mountain man

    feather and mountain man Corn fed Indiana farmgirl

    Jan 17, 2010
    We as kids had to give up something that we enjoyed through lent and were not allowed to eat meat on fridays (we could eat fish tho)
     
  7. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    So you strictly have to eat fish for the next 40 days? I hope the recipes for fishes are vast!
     
  8. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Can you eat shellfish such as lobster, shrimp?

    Eggs? Cheese, milk?
     
  9. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    The Catholic church in different regions of this country practice sooo many different things anymore, it is going to be hard to pinpoint a national consensus.

    Here, my aunt and a friend choose one thing to give up for Lent. Something they indulge in, such as candy, ranch dressing, something they would find hard to part with. I do believe the Catholic Church has relaxed rules on meatless Fridays, however many still choose to observe that practice.

    Last year my Aunt gave up candy for Lent, and we all told her to NEVER do that again... That was not pretty.
     
  10. zippitydooda

    zippitydooda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Since I'm not Catholic, I have a different perspective (I'm Presybterian).

    To me, Lent signifies a time of reflection, a time of focusing on the upcoming crucifixion of Jesus.

    There are traditionally forty days in Lent which are marked by fasting, both from foods and festivities, and by other acts of penance. The three traditional practices to be taken up with renewed vigor during Lent are prayer (justice towards God), fasting (justice towards self), and alms-giving (justice towards neighbor). Today, some people give up a vice of theirs, add something that will bring them closer to God, and often give the time or money spent doing that to charitable purposes or organizations.

    Lenten practices (as well as various other liturgical practices) are more common in Protestant circles than they once were. Many modern Protestants consider the observation of Lent to be a choice, rather than an obligation. They may decide to give up a favorite food or drink (e.g. chocolate, alcohol) or activity (e.g., going to the movies, playing video games, etc.) for Lent, or they may instead take on a Lenten discipline such as devotions, volunteering for charity work, and so on.
     

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